Food management – Deborah J Miller http://deborahjmiller.com/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 19:52:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deborahjmiller.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-35-150x150.png Food management – Deborah J Miller http://deborahjmiller.com/ 32 32 “Security in numbers” tactic protects Pacific salmon from predators https://deborahjmiller.com/security-in-numbers-tactic-protects-pacific-salmon-from-predators/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 19:16:39 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/security-in-numbers-tactic-protects-pacific-salmon-from-predators/ Environment | Press releases | Search | Science June 29, 2022 We see coho salmon swimming together. A new study has found that Pacific salmon, including coho, breed together in the open ocean to reduce the risk of being eaten by predators. Note: This photo was taken at the Seattle Aquarium and is used to […]]]>

Environment | Press releases | Search | Science

June 29, 2022

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A COUNTRY DIRECTOR for UKRAINE – Ukraine https://deborahjmiller.com/a-country-director-for-ukraine-ukraine/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 00:16:00 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/a-country-director-for-ukraine-ukraine/ Founded in 1979, Action Against Hunger is a non-governmental organization that fights against hunger. Its charter of humanitarian principles – independence, neutrality, non-discrimination, free and direct access to victims, professionalism, transparency – has been part of its identity for more than 40 years. Its mission is to save lives by ending hunger through the prevention, […]]]>

Founded in 1979, Action Against Hunger is a non-governmental organization that fights against hunger. Its charter of humanitarian principles – independence, neutrality, non-discrimination, free and direct access to victims, professionalism, transparency – has been part of its identity for more than 40 years. Its mission is to save lives by ending hunger through the prevention, detection and treatment of undernutrition, especially during and after emergencies related to conflicts or natural disasters. Action Against Hunger focuses its actions on 5 main areas of expertise: Nutrition and Health – Mental Health and Care Practices, Gender and Protection – Food Security and Livelihoods – Water, Sanitation and Hygiene – Advocacy. In 2019, Action Against Hunger helped 17 million people in over 49 countries around the world. www.actioncontrelafaim.org

We are looking for a Country Manager to lead our implementation and activities in Ukraine. A dynamic individual will be needed for this role to ensure systems are created appropriately, a strong ACF culture is established and teams move together during the transition period from acute emergency to response. longer term. This position will manage a growing team (many of whom (particularly national staff) are highly qualified but have little or no humanitarian experience), focused on both direct and evidence-based interventions. partners, including in high security locations (strong analysis and necessary support on issues such as risk transfer, and how/if to support occupied locations). The person holding the position will need to be able to build strong positive relationships not only with the ACF team but also with the authorities and our partner organisations, through the establishment and management of strong systems and good interpersonal skills. RESPONSIBILITIES

As Country Director, you will be required to lead the mission in Ukraine through the transition from an acute emergency response to a more stabilized humanitarian mission in a context that continues to rapidly evolve. Specifically, you will: 1. Continue implementing emergency response activities in multiple operational sites across the country. The current strategy emphasizes support for populations remaining in places directly affected by the conflict, displaced persons currently in transit, support for internally displaced persons in places where they have chosen to settle temporarily and support for host communities, with a focus on supporting activities as far east (and potentially north) as safely as possible. 2. Develop a longer-term strategy and response goals, with associated fundraising (if needed). 3. Oversee recruitment and set up/stabilization of systems. 4. Are in charge of mission security 5. Directly manage 7 employees and create a strong ACF culture within the team

REQUESTED PROFILE

You have at least 8 years of experience in the humanitarian field. You demonstrate leadership experience in the start-up of previous missions and in the early phases of emergency response. You have a very strong background in security management and an understanding of complex operational environments. You are known for your excellent team management skills. You have experience working with local partners in emergency response. Ideally, you have previous experience in Ukraine and/or speak Ukrainian/Russian. Experience within ACF would be a big plus.

SPECIFIC CONDITIONS / SALARY

– Fixed-term contract from 6 to 12 months under French legislation – Gross monthly salary from 3330 to 3800EUR depending on experience – Monthly per diem and subsistence allowance: 493EUR net, paid in the field – Monthly country allowance: 450EUR – Child allowance: 1500EUR per year and per child present in the country of origin (maximum 6000EUR/year) – 16% of the gross monthly salary for the reimbursement of pension insurance for foreign nationals – Transport and accommodation: Support for transport costs and pension – Medical cover: 100% reimbursement of health contributions (social security + health insurance) and repatriation insurance – Leave and RnR: 25 days of paid leave per year, 20 RnR per year and 215 EUR for each RnR period – Training: Free and unlimited access to the certifying e-learning platform Crossknowledge ©

ACF is committed to people with disabilities and actively fights against all forms of discrimination.

How to register

To apply, click on this link / To apply, please click on this following link: apply here

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FDA provides update on efforts to increase supply and availability of safe and nutritious infant formula https://deborahjmiller.com/fda-provides-update-on-efforts-to-increase-supply-and-availability-of-safe-and-nutritious-infant-formula/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 18:58:00 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/fda-provides-update-on-efforts-to-increase-supply-and-availability-of-safe-and-nutritious-infant-formula/ SILVER SPRING, MD., June 22, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration provided an update on the steps it has taken and will continue to take to ensure U.S. consumers have access to preparations for safe and nutritious infants in the weeks and months to come. “The FDA is working day and […]]]>

SILVER SPRING, MD., June 22, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration provided an update on the steps it has taken and will continue to take to ensure U.S. consumers have access to preparations for safe and nutritious infants in the weeks and months to come.

“The FDA is working day and night to ensure that parents and caregivers can easily find safe and nutritious formula products for any child who needs them,” the FDA commissioner said. Robert M. CaliffMD “I have personally spoken with infant formula manufacturers over the past few weeks and all have significantly increased their production efforts, translating into an increased supply that will be available on store shelves in the future. ‘coming.”

FDA flexibilities resulted in approximately 365 million bottles of infant formula

In the past month, the FDA has issued discretionary enforcement letters for the importation of infant formula from six countries, with an estimated total quantity of 17 million cans, or approximately 365 million full-size bottles of 8 oz. These products have already started hitting the US market and more will appear on store shelves in the weeks and months to come.

Consumers should be confident that infant formula imported into the United States through this process involves careful consideration of information provided by companies, including details of the product’s nutritional adequacy and safety, results of microbiological testing, labeling information and, most importantly, details of the manufacturing plant’s food safety production practices and inspection history.

Agency continues regular inspections of infant formula preparation facilities

The FDA takes seriously its responsibility to ensure that the foods we eat are safe and meet our rigorous quality and safety standards – this is especially true for infant formula. While the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) requires the agency to inspect domestic food facilities at least once every 3-5 years, the FDA has a policy of annually inspecting infant formula manufacturers because products are the only source of nutrition for some of our most vulnerable consumers.

This goal of annual surveillance inspections of these facilities has consistently been met over the years, with the exception of 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, even throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the FDA has continued to inspect facilities, including infant formula preparation facilities. In fact, we inspected six companies in fiscal year 2020 (October 1, 2019September 30, 2020), including several during the height of the pandemic in the summer and fall of 2020. In order to establish a priority list of companies to inspect throughout 2021, the FDA assessed companies that we did not not inspected in 2020 to focus on companies that met certain risk criteria, including a company’s inspection history, danger signals such as consumer complaints, and other factors.

While the agency postponed some food surveillance inspections during the pandemic, the FDA resumed its annual surveillance inspection schedule for infant formula facilities starting in July 2021. In fiscal year 2021 (October 1, 2020September 30, 2021), we prioritized inspections of infant formula companies, carrying out 16 nationwide inspections throughout the year; including Abbott, Mead Johnson, Gerber and Nestlé. Since the beginning of fiscal year 2022 (October 1, 2021), we have completed 10 domestic infant formula inspections and one foreign inspection, including Abbott, Mead Johnson and Gerber.

It is important to note that it is the responsibility of a company to ensure the consistent quality and safety of the products it manufactures. In addition to our oversight work, the FDA emphasizes the importance of a company’s quality systems and culture. Ultimately, when issues are detected, the onus is on the company to correct them to keep consumers safe.

Last update on Some specialized metabolic infant formulas are marketed by Abbott on a case-by-case basis

The FDA continues to work to ensure that infants and people with medical conditions who depend on certain specialty, amino acid-based, and metabolic infant formulas have access to these vital products. Some of these products have been available on a case-by-case basis from Abbott Nutrition for the past few months, as the risk of not having access to them could significantly worsen underlying medical conditions and, in some cases, pose life-threatening risks. .

To date, this case-by-case distribution has provided life-saving products to more than 2,411 infants and people in need, and more than 280,000 containers of additional products remain accessible to those in need. Products are available on a case-by-case basis to patients, hospitals and institutions by calling Abbott Nutrition at 1-800-881-0876.

Abbott Nutrition has tested certain product lots stocked by Abbott since FDA approval. February 17 warning and the company’s voluntary recall due to concerns that they were manufactured in unsanitary conditions. These products have now undergone enhanced batch testing and the company reports that none of the batches tested positive for Cronobacter, a bacterium that can cause serious foodborne illness, primarily in infants. Enhanced testing provides additional security guarantees for those who wish to access these products.

It is important to note that even with the completion of enhanced batch product testing, the agency continues to recommend that parents and caregivers who wish to access these products first work with their health care provider. child to determine if comparable products or other changes in feeding practices may be an appropriate substitute.

If comparable alternative products are not available or appropriate, parents and caregivers using these products should consider following the most recent FDA and CDC guidance on how to reduce the possibility of a Cronobacter infection. As powdered formulas are not sterile and can also be contaminated in homes, it is advisable to wash your hands with soap and water, especially before preparing bottles and feeding. Ensuring that all surfaces and feeding items are clean when preparing infant formula will also reduce the risk of possible contamination.

Abbott Sturgis Facility Update and Pre-Installation Inspections

Abbott recently announced that recent severe weather and rainfall has resulted in flooding in areas of the Sturgis facility on Monday, June 13. While this is an unfortunate setback and a reminder that natural weather events can also cause unforeseen supply chain disruptions, Abbott is working quickly to assess the damage and will report its progress to the agency in the coming days. We will return to the plant and work closely with Abbott so that the Sturgis plant can restart production of safe, quality formula products as quickly as possible.

Ensuring parents and caregivers have access to safe and available infant formula remains a top priority for the FDA, and our teams are working day and night to make it happen.

Additionally, given the overwhelming public interest in the FDA’s prior inspections of the Sturgis facility, the FDA is also releasing facility inspection reports for several previous Abbott inspections.

As previously reported, during our 2019 and 2021 inspections, the agency collected and tested samples of finished products. These samples tested negative for the pathogens. During these inspections, it was determined that the company had found lots of Cronobacter contaminated finished product and had taken the appropriate measures to destroy three batches, two in 2019 and one in 2020, before distribution.

Our last inspection in January 2022 was an inspection prompted by consumer complaints of childhood illnesses resulting from the consumption of infant formula produced at Abbott’s facilities in Sturgis.

Agency review of consumer complaints about Abbott infant formula

The work the FDA does to make sure the food we eat is safe is ongoing. This work includes ongoing monitoring of every consumer complaint she receives regarding products regulated by the agency. To date, the FDA has reviewed and investigated a total of 129 complaints associated with Abbott Nutrition formula products. Of these, 119 complaints were reported after Abbott voluntarily recalled the product on February 17.

The FDA previously reported on its review of complaints related to nine infant deaths. Only two have been associated with the investigation into the Abbott Nutrition Sturgis factory, and despite a thorough investigation, the evidence does not establish or rule out a definitive link between these infant deaths and the product made at the factory. Abbott Nutrition factory in Sturgis.

The agency was notified of another consumer complaint on June 10, 2022which resulted in the death of an infant in January 2022. The agency opened an investigation, as the complaint mentioned that the infant had consumed an Abbott product. However, the investigation into this most recent consumer complaint is in its preliminary stages and the agency will provide an update as it learns more.

Additional Resources:

Media Contact: FDA Office of Media Affairs, 301-796-4540
Consumer requests: 888-INFO-FDA

The FDA, an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, protects public health by ensuring the safety, efficacy, and safety of drugs, vaccines, and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency is also responsible for the safety and security of the food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, electronic radiation emitting products and the regulation of tobacco products.

SOURCE US Food and Drug Administration

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Northeastern Oregon Dairy Food Processors Offer to Pay for Water Testing – Oregon Capital Chronicle https://deborahjmiller.com/northeastern-oregon-dairy-food-processors-offer-to-pay-for-water-testing-oregon-capital-chronicle/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 21:45:39 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/northeastern-oregon-dairy-food-processors-offer-to-pay-for-water-testing-oregon-capital-chronicle/ In response to groundwater nitrate emergency In Morrow County, several food processors, a factory farm and an Amazon data center have stepped up to pay for drinking water testing and water distribution for people who depend on wells drawing from a contaminated aquifer. Amazon Web Services, Boardman Foods, Lamb Weston, Calbee North America, Tillamook County […]]]>

In response to groundwater nitrate emergency In Morrow County, several food processors, a factory farm and an Amazon data center have stepped up to pay for drinking water testing and water distribution for people who depend on wells drawing from a contaminated aquifer.

Amazon Web Services, Boardman Foods, Lamb Weston, Calbee North America, Tillamook County Creamery Association, and Threemile Canyon Farms are creating a business coalition to help the Morrow County Health Department work to meet drinking water needs, according to a press release issued Monday by the Boardman Chamber of Commerce.

The move comes after Morrow County Commissioner Jim Doherty launched an effort to step up testing and provide water to residents living at the top of the polluted aquifer. He requested money from state and federal authorities to deal with the emergency.

Almost all of the companies in the newly announced coalition operate out of the industrial complex run by the Port of Morrow.

It was recently discovered that the government agency had pumped 260 tons of excess nitrogen from farms in the area, in violation of state restrictions. Oregon’s Department of Environmental Quality fined the port $1.3 million in January, then last week increased the fine to $800,000 after finding the port was continuing to pumping illegal amounts of nitrogen onto area farms even after the January enforcement action was taken.

This excess nitrogen is “likely to cause additional negative impacts” on groundwater nitrate levels, according to the DEQ’s revised penalty.

Port officials disputed the initial sanction.

Well users in Morrow County draw water from the lower Umatilla Basin, which has become increasingly contaminated with nitrates over the past 30 years from agricultural fertilizers, animal manure and sewage of the port and food processors in the region. There are approximately 1,300 private domestic wells that draw water from this basin in Morrow County. Many of those who depend on these wells for their drinking water are low-income and Latino.

According to the National Cancer Institute, nitrate-rich water consumed over long periods of time can lead to stomach, bladder, and bowel cancers, as well as miscarriages and “blue baby syndrome,” preventing pregnancy. oxygen to move through the infant’s blood.

An investigation earlier this year by the Capital Chronicle revealed contamination at the port had persisted much longer more than three years, and with little application from DEQ until recently.

Many of the companies that have stepped up to help with water testing and drinking water distribution are also sources of nitrate contamination in the groundwater area of ​​the lower Umatilla Basin. The Groundwater Management Area Committee tasked with tackling the nitrate problem estimates that around 70% of contamination comes from farms, around 20% from dairy and beef farms and around 5% from food processors and the port .

One of the partners in the new collaboration is Threemile Canyon Farms, a large dairy that supplies the Tillamook County Creamery Association. The dairy, located in Boardman, operates outside the port complex.

Boardman Foods will start distributing water test kits from next Monday June 27 at its onion processing plant in Morrow Port. The contest will continue every Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. The company will accept water samples to send for analysis.

From Thursday, June 23, the Boardman chamber will also offer testing in its offices.

“This is an issue that affects all of our neighbors – local businesses are ready to serve and help,” according to a statement from Debbie Radie, vice president of operations for Boardman Foods.

The chamber’s statement does not specify how other companies will be involved in the water testing and distribution efforts. The chamber’s executive director, Torrie Griggs, did not return calls or emails on Monday.

The offer from local businesses to support clean water efforts adds to those launched this week by the Morrow County Emergency Management Team and the Oregon Department of Social Services.

Beginning Tuesday, June 21, bottled water will be available at the Morrow County Public Health Department office in Boardman from 10 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. On Friday, water will be available from 10 a.m. to noon and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

The water is restricted to home well owners whose faucets have tested for 10 parts per million or more nitrate or well owners who are waiting to have their wells tested. County officials are asking well owners to bring proof of their nitrate test results to receive the emergency water supply.

Supplies are limited to two gallons per person per day, for a total of 14 gallons per person per week. Water can be delivered to people unable to reach distribution sites.

Do a water test:

Boardman Foods, 71320 E Columbia Blvd, Boardman OR 97818

Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays

Boardman Chamber of Commerce, 101 Olson Road, Boardman OR 97818

Get bottled water:

Boardman:

Public Health Department, 101 Boardman Ave. NW

Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Friday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Irrigation:

County Government Building at Irrigon, 215 NE Main Ave.

Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Friday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Have drinking water delivered to you:

Dial 541-256-0514 to be added to the water distribution list.

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How did the Russian-Ukrainian war trigger a global food crisis? | Explanatory news https://deborahjmiller.com/how-did-the-russian-ukrainian-war-trigger-a-global-food-crisis-explanatory-news/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 22:26:27 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/how-did-the-russian-ukrainian-war-trigger-a-global-food-crisis-explanatory-news/ Russia’s war in Ukraine is preventing grain from leaving the “breadbasket of the world” and making food more expensive around the world, threatening to worsen shortages, hunger and political instability in developing countries. Together, Russia and Ukraine export nearly a third of the world’s wheat and barley, more than 70% of its sunflower oil, and […]]]>

Russia’s war in Ukraine is preventing grain from leaving the “breadbasket of the world” and making food more expensive around the world, threatening to worsen shortages, hunger and political instability in developing countries.

Together, Russia and Ukraine export nearly a third of the world’s wheat and barley, more than 70% of its sunflower oil, and are major suppliers of corn.

Russia is the world’s largest fertilizer producer.

World food prices were already rising and the war made matters worse, preventing some 20 million tonnes of Ukrainian grain from reaching the Middle East, North Africa and parts of Asia.

Weeks of negotiations over safe corridors to get grain out of Ukraine’s Black Sea ports have made little progress, with urgency increasing as the summer harvest season approaches.

“It must happen in the next two months [or] it’s going to be horrible,” said Anna Nagurney, who studies crisis management at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and sits on the board of trustees of the Kyiv School of Economics.

She says 400 million people around the world depend on Ukrainian food supplies. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) predicts that up to 181 million people in 41 countries could face a food crisis or worse levels of hunger this year.

Here is an overview of the global food crisis:

What is the situation ?

Typically, 90% of wheat and other grains from Ukrainian fields are shipped to world markets by sea, but have been blocked by Russian blockades on the Black Sea coast.

Some of the grain is re-routed across Europe by rail, road and river, but the amount is a drop in the ocean compared to sea routes. Shipments are also backed up because Ukraine’s rail gauges do not match those of its neighbors to the west.

Ukraine’s Deputy Agriculture Minister Markian Dmytrasevych has asked European Union lawmakers to help him export more grain, including expanding the use of a Romanian port on the Black Sea, building more cargo terminals on the Danube and cutting red tape for moving goods through the Polish port. border.

But that means food is even further away from those who need it.

“Now we have to go around Europe to get back to the Mediterranean. It really added an incredible cost to Ukrainian grain,” said Joseph Glauber, a senior researcher at the International Food Policy Research Institute in Washington.

Ukraine has only been able to export 1.5 to 2 million tonnes of grain per month since the start of the war, compared to more than 6 million tonnes, Glauber said.

Russian grain does not come out either.

Moscow says Western sanctions against its banking and shipping sectors prevent Russia from exporting food and fertilizers and scare foreign shipping companies from transporting them. Russian officials are pushing for sanctions to be lifted to get grain to world markets.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen and other Western leaders, however, say the sanctions do not affect food.

A Ukrainian farmer wears a bulletproof vest and a helmet while working in the fields in Zaporizhzhia region, Ukraine, in April 2022 [File photo: Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters]

What are the parties saying?

Ukraine has accused Russia of bombing agricultural infrastructure, burning fields, stealing grain and trying to sell it to Syria after Lebanon and Egypt refused to buy it.

Satellite images taken in late May by Maxar Technologies show Russian-flagged ships in a Crimean port laden with grain, then days later docked in Syria with their hatches open.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said Russia had caused a global food crisis. The West agrees, with officials such as European Council President Charles Michel and US Secretary of State Antony Blinken saying Russia is weaponizing food.

Russia says exports can resume once Ukraine removes mines from the Black Sea and arriving ships can be checked for weapons.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov promised that Moscow “would not abuse” its naval advantage and “take all necessary measures so that the ships could leave freely”.

Ukrainian and Western officials doubt the promise.

Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said this week that it might be possible to create safe corridors without the need to clear the sea because the location of explosive devices is known.

But other questions would remain, such as whether insurers would provide cover for the ships.

Dmytrasevych told EU agriculture ministers this week that the only solution was to defeat Russia and unblock the ports: “No other temporary measures, such as humanitarian corridors, will solve the problem.”

How did we come here?

Food prices were rising before the invasion, due to factors such as bad weather and poor harvests which reduced supplies, while global demand rebounded strongly after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Glauber cited poor wheat crops last year in the United States and Canada and a drought that hurt soybean yields in Brazil.

Also exacerbated by climate change, the Horn of Africa is facing one of its worst droughts in four decades, while a record heat wave in India in March reduced wheat yields.

This, coupled with soaring fuel and fertilizer prices, has prevented other major grain-producing countries from filling the gaps.

Who is most affected?

Ukraine and Russia mainly export commodities to developing countries which are most vulnerable to cost increases and shortages.

Countries like Somalia, Libya, Lebanon, Egypt and Sudan are heavily dependent on wheat, corn and sunflower oil from the two warring countries.

“The burden is borne by the very poor,” Glauber said. “It’s a humanitarian crisis, no doubt.”

In addition to the threat of hunger, soaring food prices risk causing political instability in these countries. They were one of the causes of the Arab Spring, and there are fears that it could happen again.

Governments in developing countries must either let food prices rise or subsidize costs, Glauber said. A moderately prosperous country like Egypt, the world’s largest wheat importer, can afford to absorb higher food costs, he said.

“For poor countries like Yemen or countries in the Horn of Africa, they are really going to need humanitarian aid,” he said.

Famine and starvation are rampant in this part of Africa. In some cases, prices of staples such as wheat and cooking oil have more than doubled, while millions of livestock that families use for milk and meat have died. In Sudan and Yemen, the Russian-Ukrainian conflict has added to years of internal crises.

UNICEF has warned of an “explosion of child deaths” if the world focuses solely on the war in Ukraine and does not act.

UN agencies have estimated that more than 200,000 people in Somalia are facing “catastrophic hunger and starvation”, around 18 million Sudanese could experience acute famine by September and 19 million Yemenis facing severe hunger. food insecurity this year.

Wheat prices have increased in some of these countries by up to 750%.

“Generally, everything has become expensive. Whether it’s water or food, it becomes almost impossible,” said Justus Liku, a food security adviser with the aid group CARE, who recently visited Somalia.

In Lebanon, bakeries that once had many types of flatbreads now only sell basic white pita bread to preserve the flour.

What do we do ?

For weeks, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has been trying to secure a deal to unblock Russian grain and fertilizer exports and allow Ukraine to ship goods from the key port of Odessa . But progress has been slow.

Meanwhile, a large amount of grain is stuck in Ukrainian silos or on farms. And there’s more to come – the winter wheat harvest in Ukraine is starting soon, putting more pressure on storage facilities, although some fields may not be harvested due to fighting.

Serhiy Hrebtsov cannot sell the grain mountain from his farm in the Donbass region because transport links have been cut. The scarcity of buyers means prices are so low that agriculture is unsustainable.

“There are options to sell, but it’s like throwing it away,” he said.

US President Joe Biden said he was working with European partners on a plan to build temporary silos on Ukraine’s borders, including with Poland – a solution that would also resolve the differing rail gauges between Ukraine and Europe.

The idea is that the grain can be transferred to the silos and then “into cars in Europe and get it out to the ocean and around the world. But it takes time,” he said in a speech on Tuesday.

What costs more?

Wheat prices rose 45 percent in the first three months of the year from a year earlier, according to the FAO Wheat Price Index. Vegetable oil jumped 41%, while prices for sugar, meat, milk and fish also rose by double digits.

The increases are fueling faster inflation around the world, making groceries more expensive and raising costs for restaurant owners, who have been forced to raise prices.

Some countries react by trying to protect domestic supplies. India has restricted sugar and wheat exports, while Malaysia has halted live chicken exports, alarming Singapore, which gets a third of its poultry from its neighbour.

The International Food Policy Research Institute says that if food shortages worsen as the war drags on, it could lead to more export restrictions that will further drive up prices.

Another threat is the scarcity and cost of fertilizers, which means fields could be less productive as farmers skimp, said Steve Mathews of Gro Intelligence, an agricultural data and analytics company.

There are particularly large shortages of two of the main chemicals in fertilizers, of which Russia is a big supplier.

“If we continue to have the shortage of potassium and phosphate that we have right now, we will see lower yields,” Mathews said. “No question about that in the years to come.”

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Vajra, an Indian Nepalese restaurant in West Town, will close this weekend https://deborahjmiller.com/vajra-an-indian-nepalese-restaurant-in-west-town-will-close-this-weekend/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 20:36:31 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/vajra-an-indian-nepalese-restaurant-in-west-town-will-close-this-weekend/ Vajra, a Nepalese Indian restaurant in West Town that has made a name for itself serving upscale classic dishes such as tandoori venison, goat steak and lobster momos, will close its doors on Sunday, June 19, after three years, announced its owners. on Instagram earlier this week. The restaurant has come through the pandemic more […]]]>

Vajra, a Nepalese Indian restaurant in West Town that has made a name for itself serving upscale classic dishes such as tandoori venison, goat steak and lobster momos, will close its doors on Sunday, June 19, after three years, announced its owners. on Instagram earlier this week.

The restaurant has come through the pandemic more or less intact, says co-owner Dipesh Kakshapaty, speaking on behalf of the management team. The dining room closed in March 2020 – for good, it turned out – but Vajra did a good business with takeout and delivery, although some of the more fancy dishes had to be cut from the menu. It was after the pandemic restrictions were lifted that the problems started.

“We started to get a little scared about the future,” Kakshapaty says. “The present is fine. But the deferred payments are coming due, we have to pay our taxes, there’s the rising cost of labor and food and everything. The margins are getting thinner and thinner. We wanted to make sure we weren’t digging ourselves into a bigger hole.

The lease for their storefront on Chicago Avenue was not due to expire for another year, but the owners decided to see if they could find someone to take over. If no one was interested, they persevered, but soon after they started inquiring, Mo Carter, the owner of Sketch, an Afro-Asian fusion restaurant, offered to take over. Sketch will open in mid-July.

The owners’ biggest concern, Kakshapaty says, was the fate of its employees, especially the chef, Min Thapa. Thapa had worked with Kakshapaty at his former restaurant, Cumin in Wicker Park, and his cooking had been instrumental in Vajra’s success, which included two years on the Michelin Bib Gourmand list and a Jean Banchet nomination. He had also survived a bout with colon cancer in 2019, and the owners didn’t want to leave him unemployed.

Luckily, Thapa and two other chefs have found a home at Rishi, a takeout-only Indian restaurant near River West. Owner Pravin Khadka also worked with Kakshapaty at Cumin. “People love [Thapa’s] food wherever he goes,” says Kakshapaty. The other remaining employees also found work elsewhere.

So now the owners are at peace with the decision, Kakshapaty says. “The industry is in constant transition right now,” he says. “Whatever Vajra has achieved in the past, the leader will repeat the same magic. It’s a bittersweet moment, but it’s for good. Everything that came out of it was good.

vajra1329 W. Chicago Avenue, open 5-9 p.m. daily, take-out and delivery only.

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Assistant Athletic Director Dr Nick Pettit accepts new position https://deborahjmiller.com/assistant-athletic-director-dr-nick-pettit-accepts-new-position/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 00:08:02 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/assistant-athletic-director-dr-nick-pettit-accepts-new-position/ SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. — Dr. Nick Pettitdeputy athletic director at Cal Poly for more than seven years, announced his resignation to accept the position of athletic director for the school district of Sparta in his home state of Michigan. “I am extremely excited for this new chapter in my career, serving student-athletes and helping […]]]>
SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. — Dr. Nick Pettitdeputy athletic director at Cal Poly for more than seven years, announced his resignation to accept the position of athletic director for the school district of Sparta in his home state of Michigan.

“I am extremely excited for this new chapter in my career, serving student-athletes and helping them achieve their goals and aspirations,” said Pettit.

“It has been an honor and a privilege to be part of an organization that embraces and embodies such high academic and athletic standards,” said Dr. Pettit. “Cal Poly is a very special place. My thanks to President Armstrong and Don Oberhelmann for giving me this amazing opportunity.”

Dr. Pettit, who has over 25 years of athletic experience, facilitated the construction of the Dignity Health Baseball Clubhouse as well as Doerr Family Field and the Steve Miller & John Capriotti Athletics Complex. His other projects included the recently completed installation of artificial turf at Alex G. Spanos Stadium, Swanson Beach Volleyball Complex, Mustang Golf Academy at Dairy Creek Golf Course, and various Bob Janssen (softball) fields and Mott Athletics Center (basketball and volleyball). improvements.

Pettit has also been involved in recent head coaching searches for soccer, men’s basketball, men’s and women’s golf, women’s tennis and beach volleyball. Cal Poly’s contract with Adidas and the development, delivery and implementation of the strategic plan for 2016-22 were also under Pettit’s watch and he served as Vice President of Cal Poly Corporation.

“Dr. Pettit has been an integral part of Cal Poly Athletics during his seven years with the Mustangs,” the Cal Poly athletic director said. Don Oberhelmann. “His leadership will be missed and we wish him and his family well in their new opportunities in Michigan.”

Prior to being hired at Cal Poly in January 2015, Dr. Pettit served as Associate Athletic Director of Facilities and Event Operations at San Diego State for nearly seven years.

He began his second stint with the Aztecs in July 2003 as Director of Equipment Services and was promoted in 2008 to Associate Athletic Director of Facilities and Event Operations, a position in which he successfully led several areas of the department, including all sports facilities, events, video services, equipment operations, men’s soccer, softball and women’s rowing.

Among his many duties with the Aztecs, Pettit played a lead role in managing facility improvement projects totaling over $7 million, including a 1,700 square foot softball clubhouse, Peterson Gymnasium renovation, the installation of championship level field lighting for the SportsDeck (football and track installation), renovation of the football practice field, installation of the Daktronics LED board of the softball field and renovation of the Fowler Athletic Center.

Prior to arriving at San Diego State, Pettit was the equipment manager for the San Francisco 49ers from 1999 to 2003. As an undergraduate at Michigan State, Pettit served as Director of Football in head coach from 1995 to 1998. Under head coach Nick Saban, he oversaw a team of eight students in daily practices and game setup. Pettit was assistant director of graduate trainee equipment at San Diego State during the 1998-99 academic year.

Pettit is originally from Grand Ledge, Michigan. He graduated from Michigan State University in 1998 with a Bachelor of Science in Food Industry Management, earned a Masters in Sports Management from the United States Sports Academy in Daphne, Alabama, in 2007, and completed his Ph.D. in educational leadership in San Diego. State in 2013. Pettit’s doctoral research has focused on the academic achievement of Division I student-athletes, particularly within the at-risk population, and how athletic departments can better serve their students.

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Afghanistan: World Bank provides $150 million lifeline to stem hunger in rural areas | https://deborahjmiller.com/afghanistan-world-bank-provides-150-million-lifeline-to-stem-hunger-in-rural-areas/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 15:40:37 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/afghanistan-world-bank-provides-150-million-lifeline-to-stem-hunger-in-rural-areas/ Some 19.7 million people, nearly half of Afghanistan’s population, face acute hunger, meaning they are unable to feed themselves on a daily basis, according to the latest analysis of the Integrated Phase Classification of Security Index (IPC) released last month by UN and aid partners including FAO and the World Food Program (WFP). “We are […]]]>

Some 19.7 million people, nearly half of Afghanistan’s population, face acute hunger, meaning they are unable to feed themselves on a daily basis, according to the latest analysis of the Integrated Phase Classification of Security Index (IPC) released last month by UN and aid partners including FAO and the World Food Program (WFP).

“We are grateful to the World Bank and its members for their generous and timely contribution,” said FAO Director-General QU Dongyu.

historic moment

Ripple effects of war in Ukraine worsen food security situationpushing food prices to new highs, increasing food production costs, especially fertilizers, and pressuring countries in the region supplying wheat to Afghanistan, to restrict food exports, in order to ensure supplies sufficient interiors.

The new Afghanistan Emergency Food Security Project will boost the production of food crops for small-scale Afghan farmers.

This is the first installment of a total of $195 million, with an additional $45 million to be released over the next 24 months.

This is a historic moment for poor farmers in Afghanistan, and it represents an important milestone in our collective efforts to achieve results. at scale, avert impending disaster and make real transformative differences in the lives of vulnerable people,” Mr QU said.

Focus on wheat

FAO will be the sole implementing partner for the funding, which will focus on two main components.

In terms of wheat production, it will support about 2.1 million people during the November and March-November 2023 planting seasons.

The project will also provide targeted support to the nutritional needs of children, people with disabilities or chronic illnesses, and female-headed households. Seeds and basic tools will be provided for the vegetable garden, as well as technical training on improved nutrition and climate-smart production practices.

Target women

Nearly one million people will benefit from this support, particularly rural women: some 150,000 of them will receive training in improved farming techniques and nutrition.

The project will help link beneficiaries to local markets to facilitate the sale of marketable surpluses of wheat, vegetables and pulses.

Building Resilience

Second, the project will increase access to water for irrigation, while improving soil and water conservation.

It will also build climate resilience by supporting the rehabilitation and improvement of selected irrigation and watershed management systems on over 137,000 hectares of land.

Through the project, it is hoped that more than 1.9 million people will benefit from cash-for-work activities for the restoration of irrigation infrastructure and watershed management.

FAO programs

In addition to food aid, the FAO Food Security Project is one of three projects totaling $793 million approved by the World Bank to provide livelihoods and essential health services to the people. Afghan.

The World Bank is also strengthening other ongoing FAO programs in Afghanistan, funded by the Asian Development Bank and other donors.

Together they provide immediate assistance to save lives and protect livelihoods with activities that can enhance longer-term recovery and build resilience.

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Commissioner Fried Provides Testimony to US Senate Agriculture Committee on Unfair Trade Practices Harming Florida Growers / Press Releases 2022 / Press Releases / News & Events / Home https://deborahjmiller.com/commissioner-fried-provides-testimony-to-us-senate-agriculture-committee-on-unfair-trade-practices-harming-florida-growers-press-releases-2022-press-releases-news-events-home/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 22:32:19 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/commissioner-fried-provides-testimony-to-us-senate-agriculture-committee-on-unfair-trade-practices-harming-florida-growers-press-releases-2022-press-releases-news-events-home/ Tallahassee, Florida. – Today, Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Nikki Fried submitted written testimony of U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Subcommittee on Commodities, Risk Management, and Trade urging Congress to address the unfair trade practices that have damaged Florida farmers for decades and the lack of protections for the nation’s seasonal produce industry. […]]]>

Tallahassee, Florida. – Today, Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Nikki Fried submitted written testimony of U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Subcommittee on Commodities, Risk Management, and Trade urging Congress to address the unfair trade practices that have damaged Florida farmers for decades and the lack of protections for the nation’s seasonal produce industry.

“Our state’s fruit and vegetable farming industry alone supports 68,700 jobs and generates $5 billion in annual revenue. In times of heightened food insecurity both at home and abroad and with soaring food prices, protecting the national food supply chain is a matter of national security. Our producers work tirelessly to feed our families and communities; we have to have our backs”, wrote Commissioner Fried.

“Passing the Law on the Defense of the Production of National Products (HR 3926 and S. 2080) is something Congress can and should pass without further delay to protect the strength of our national industry as we continue to work together to address the current challenges facing the industry,” she concluded.

Background: Commissioner Fried remains a strong advocate for the national seasonal produce industry, continuously calling for prompt and effective relief for farmers in Florida and the United States since taking office in 2019. In August 2020, Commissioner Fried testified at a virtual hearing held by the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the United States Department of Commerce, presenting a major report showing the economic harm that these trade-distorting policies are causing Florida farmers and our economy as a whole. FDACS report published in August 2021 that the Commissioner Fried shared with USDA and USTR.

Following the August 2020 hearing, the same three federal agencies presented a plan to help the national seasonal produce industry, and the commissioner Fried reiterated its commitment to hold the administration accountable for providing enforceable protections and access to relief for Florida farmers. Following this hearing, the ITC launched several investigations into the impacts of increased foreign imports on several seasonal crops. In addition to testifying before the ITC on cucumbers and squash, Commissioner Fried also testified during its blueberry investigations and provided commentary on its strawberry and pepper investigation since no formal hearing was held. Commissioner Fried continues to work closely with Florida specialty crop growers and members of Congress demanding protections for the nation’s seasonal produce industry.

A copy of the commissioner’s statement for the record can be found here and lower.

Statement by the Honorable Nicole “Nikki” Fried

U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Subcommittee on Commodities, Risk Management, and Trade

Agricultural Trade Hearing: Priorities and Issues Facing U.S. Farmers

June 9, 2022

President Warnock, Ranking Member Hoeven and subcommittee members, thank you for the opportunity to address the concerns and priorities of Florida’s agricultural industry. Foremost among these issues are unfair foreign trade practices and lack of protection for domestic growers of seasonal and perishable crops, including those in Florida. This problem may have started in the Sunshine State, but, as President Warnock can attest given the impact these issues are also having on Georgian producers, it is spreading rapidly and will impact the entire our national seasonal products industry. We have long sounded the alarm on this issue and now, more than ever, it is critical that Congress act in light of the USMCA’s failure to remedy this harmful situation.

Florida’s agricultural industry is the backbone of our state. It is our second largest industry and has an economic impact of nearly $150 billion. We have 47,500 farms and ranches, and the agriculture industry supports over 2.4 million jobs. Our state’s agricultural produce and vegetable industry alone supports 68,700 jobs and generates $5 billion in annual revenue. In times of heightened food insecurity both at home and abroad and with soaring food prices, protecting the national food supply chain is a matter of national security. Our producers work tirelessly to feed our families and communities; we have to have their backs.

As you may know, Florida and Mexico share a growing season given our subtropical climates. The Mexican government’s agricultural subsidies — in addition to their lower labor safety and environmental standards — allow Mexican producers to artificially sell produce at low prices in the US market. In 2021, these Mexican imports increased drastically. My department found[ ] that since 2000, Florida’s share of the US domestic market has fallen by 40%, while Mexico’s has increased by 217%. In 2020, U.S. imports of strawberries grown in Mexico were up 27%, other berries were up 17%, peppers were up 16%, and that’s just a few. While we have tracked these harmful foreign trade practices with a focus on Mexico, other foreign agricultural industries are also taking advantage of the fact that current trade laws leave US producers unprotected and without access to remedy in the face of this continued dumping. . I enclose the most recent economic reports produced by my department on the negative impact this has had over the years on many commodities and several states. This documented harm, which has lasted for decades, is why we need the protections outlined in bipartisan, bicameral law. Law on the Defense of the Production of National Products (HR 3926 and S. 2080) to be signed into law, a bill for which we are grateful has the support of President Warnock.

As you all know, farming is a demanding profession and the importance of our agriculture industry cannot be overemphasized, from feeding families to creating jobs to national security in these uncertain times. In the face of so many challenges beyond our control, such as more extreme weather and supply chain issues caused by a once-in-a-generation pandemic and Russia’s war in Ukraine, we must do all we can to help support our vital agricultural industry. I am grateful for the steps already taken by the Biden administration to help our producers overcome these long-term challenges, and encourage congressional action for additional immediate assistance to our farmers during these difficult times. But there can and must be timely and effective assistance to our domestic seasonal produce industry to stem the damage wrought by decades of unchecked unfair foreign trade practices since NAFTA.

Pass the Law on the Defense of the Production of National Products (HR 3926 and S. 2080) is something Congress can and should pass without further delay to protect the strength of our national industry as we continue to work together to address the current challenges facing the industry. Please know that the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services stands ready to assist the Senate Agriculture Committee as we work to grow America. Thank you for your attention to this important subject.

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Cascading risks are disrupting food supply chains: Transformative adaptation is the way forward – World https://deborahjmiller.com/cascading-risks-are-disrupting-food-supply-chains-transformative-adaptation-is-the-way-forward-world/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 06:38:37 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/cascading-risks-are-disrupting-food-supply-chains-transformative-adaptation-is-the-way-forward-world/ In 2022, the early onset of heat waves in South Asia was a unique example of cumulative and cascading risks in this interconnected world. The heat waves that hit India earlier this year coincided with the critical milking and grain-filling stage of the wheat harvest in mid-March. Consequently, India’s wheat yields have fallen by 10% […]]]>

In 2022, the early onset of heat waves in South Asia was a unique example of cumulative and cascading risks in this interconnected world. The heat waves that hit India earlier this year coincided with the critical milking and grain-filling stage of the wheat harvest in mid-March. Consequently, India’s wheat yields have fallen by 10% to 15%, with forecast production for 2022-23 falling from 110 to 99 million tonnes. Food security risks and the sudden spike in world wheat prices due to a supply shortage have led the Indian government to impose a broad ban on wheat exports, with some exceptions to neighboring countries, and to help countries complement their national food security policies. Additionally, the conflict between Russia and Ukraine has also disrupted wheat exports from the Black Sea region.

The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report (2021/2022) highlights that multiple and interacting climate and non-climate risks are worsening and cascading across sectors and regions . Weather and climate extremes also have cross-border economic and social impacts due to interconnected supply chains, markets and natural resource flows.

Adaptation gaps

Adaptation planning and implementation is accelerating around the world. However, these measures are mainly targeted at short-term risks, focused on planning rather than implementation, small-scale, fragmented and sector-specific. The recent Adaptation Gap Report 2021 published by UNEP highlights that there are significant gaps between current investments in adaptation and those needed to respond effectively to climate risks and impacts. Estimated adaptation costs in developing countries are five to ten times higher than current international public financial flows for adaptation. This adaptation finance gap is widening. A review of updated Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) reveals that the four key sectors of agriculture, infrastructure, water and disaster risk management , represent three-quarters of quantified adaptation financing needs.

Adaptation limits

Indeed, the effectiveness of adaptation measures should also be impacted due to the rapid increase in temperatures. Currently, within soft limits, integrated, risk-informed and multi-sectoral adaptation solutions deliver far-reaching benefits. However, with increasing temperature, many natural adaptive systems are approaching hard limits of their natural adaptive capacity and others will reach this limit with increasing global warming. Above 1.5°C of global warming, some ecosystem-based adaptation measures will reach their hard limits, losing their effectiveness in providing benefits to people.

Transformative adaptation

In the above context, transformative adaptation is an effective and sustainable way to reduce climate risk. Given the soft and hard limits, adaptation measures also need to be innovative in order to address compounding and cascading emerging risks. Following the recent IPCC report, ESCAP narrowed the global warming patterns to Asia and the Pacific and its subregions. The Asia-Pacific 1.5°C Risk Landscape: Sub-Regional Pathways for Adaptation and Resilience was launched on May 25, 2022 and presents the results of this modeling study. The report calls for a transformative adaptation program in the most risky region.

ESCAP analysis shows that under all climate change scenarios, and relative to global averages, Asia and the Pacific will be the most affected by heavy rainfall, followed by agricultural drought, hot temperatures/heatwaves and warming winds with the intensification of tropical cyclones. In addition, the report highlights how each ESCAP subregion will be affected in medium- and long-term climate scenarios, and where new hotspots of exposure and vulnerability to climate-induced cascading multi-hazard scenarios will be created. . This analysis highlights important details because global and regional analysis often masks sub-regional specificities.

Transformative adaptation must consider risks at all levels – regional, sub-regional, national and sub-national. For transboundary hazards that represent shared vulnerabilities and risks, adaptation measures should include the integration of climate change scenarios into various plans, programs, etc. in the medium and long term, both at national and sub-regional level. In light of this, the ESCAP report presents a set of adaptation priorities – (i) strengthening multi-hazard risk assessment and early warning systems; (ii) improving agricultural production in drylands; (iii) make water resource management more resilient; (iv) nature-based solutions; and (v) making new infrastructure resilient. For example, the recent ESCAP study on inland water-related disasters in the Aral Sea shows that adaptation measures such as strengthening multiple risk assessment and early warning systems as well as Improving dryland agricultural production had the highest priority score in the five Central Asian countries under the various climate change scenarios. Similarly, ESCAP’s work on impact-based forecasting that supports the WMO-led initiative and the Beijing Climate Center – Forum on Regional Climate Monitoring – Assessment-Prediction for Asia (FOCRA ), assess the potential impacts of the Asian monsoon this year on agriculture. Impact scenarios provide strategic information to avoid disruptions in food supply chains by indicating potential shortfalls in food production well in advance and issuing warnings of any impending food security challenges.

In addition, understanding transboundary risks and adaptation priorities should take into account the NDC, NAP, sector adaptation plans, national disaster risk reduction strategies and the voluntary national review. In this regard, the ESCAP Risk and Resilience Portal with adaptation priorities vis-à-vis the climate risk profiles of 56 ESCAP members and associate members is an important initiative that contributes to filling the gaps on adaptation in Asia and the Pacific.

Note: The lead authors were supported by Armita Behboodi, Rahul Kumar Suman, Akash Shrivastav and Shashwat Avi of Disaster Risk Reduction Section, IDD, ESCAP in the preparation and research of this article.

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