Food management – Deborah J Miller http://deborahjmiller.com/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 20:13:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://deborahjmiller.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-35-150x150.png Food management – Deborah J Miller http://deborahjmiller.com/ 32 32 Plant-based diet for the big apple? This is the plan https://deborahjmiller.com/plant-based-diet-for-the-big-apple-this-is-the-plan/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 18:11:15 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/plant-based-diet-for-the-big-apple-this-is-the-plan/ September 24, 2021 – In 2016, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams battled his diagnosis of type 2 diabetes by adopting a plant-based diet. Now, as the alleged next mayor of New York City, he plans to take his constituents on his “finally healthy” journey. “It is important to shift our health care system from health […]]]>

September 24, 2021 – In 2016, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams battled his diagnosis of type 2 diabetes by adopting a plant-based diet. Now, as the alleged next mayor of New York City, he plans to take his constituents on his “finally healthy” journey.

“It is important to shift our health care system from health care to health care, and there is no greater impact in doing so than looking at how we are fueling the crisis at the government level,” Adams said in an interview. “My response is to introduce a complete plant-based diet to everyday New Yorkers… we will begin the transition to a healthier lifestyle.

Adams, who was a police captain and then state senator before becoming president of the Brooklyn borough in 2013, won the New York mayor’s Democratic primary in June 2021 and is set to win the general election on November 2 by a wide margin.

In October 2020, he published a book, Finally in good health, who recounts his journey from unhealthy eating habits as a police officer, habits that followed him to his elected post, to his life-changing decision to adopt an all-plant diet after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in March 2016, at the age of 56.

It also explains the many drawbacks of the typical Western diet and African-American cultural soul food, reviews some of the scientific evidence supporting plant-based diets for preventing and alleviating chronic health problems, and offers some suggestions. tips for making the switch. In the last chapter, he offers 51 herbal recipes. To learn more about Adams’ journey with diabetes, click here.

Adams cut all animal products from his diet – including meat, poultry, dairy, and fish – and advocates doing so in his book.

But he doesn’t expect all New Yorkers to do the same (at least not yet) and his post won’t use the word “vegan.” Instead, the plan is to make plant-based diets the main menu option in places where the city government feeds people, starting in hospitals and possibly later in prisons and office buildings. from the city. (School meals are under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Agriculture.)

“We’re going to be extremely creative… So instead of automatically giving people bad food, highly processed foods, we’re going to use plants by default. If anyone wants anything other than herbal they can reach out and we’ll make it available, but we’ll start by making people default to herbs, ”he said. declared.


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The rebirth of a historic journey through Spain https://deborahjmiller.com/the-rebirth-of-a-historic-journey-through-spain/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 23:12:49 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/the-rebirth-of-a-historic-journey-through-spain/ Elsewhere in Spain, the restoration of motorable roads could help more pastoralists to resume transhumance on foot, in particular in Castile and León, a major crossing point and destination for transhumance. According to Garzón, the region has failed to comply with the 1995 Cattle Trails Act which protects, preserves and promotes motorized roads. Due to […]]]>

Elsewhere in Spain, the restoration of motorable roads could help more pastoralists to resume transhumance on foot, in particular in Castile and León, a major crossing point and destination for transhumance. According to Garzón, the region has failed to comply with the 1995 Cattle Trails Act which protects, preserves and promotes motorized roads. Due to their condition, breeders are reluctant to use them. “I’m afraid… in almost 30 years of the law, virtually nothing has been done – no signage, no demarcation, no improvement of cattle tracks,” he adds.

Differentiating extensive grazing – when livestock are raised on natural pastures – from industrial agriculture is also essential, says Peiteado. Without this distinction, “policies cannot be properly oriented in favor of pastoralism,” she said. “This characterization and differentiation… is the first step that must be taken to guarantee the future of pastoralism in Spain.

On the one hand, according to Peiteado, this would allow tools such as public funds from the European Union’s common agricultural policy to ensure the socio-economic viability of extensive grazing. On the other hand, differentiation would allow consumers to support pastoralism. “The problem we have in Spain… is that when we go to buy a product on the market, as consumers, we cannot differentiate ourselves”, explains Peiteado. “There should be clear labeling that allows us to see what comes from extensive farming and what comes from factory farming, so that knowing the impacts of one model and the benefits of the other, we can Choose.”

Oteros-Rozas agrees that it is essential to recognize the true value of the product. “The shepherds say they want the product to be valued, and priced according to value… the main thing is to stop subsidizing industrial agriculture and imports of meat and dairy products from other countries… which compete unfairly with our local pastoral systems, “she says.

Defenders of pastoralism hope it will continue to carve out a place for itself in a world that has changed dramatically since the first transhumant shepherds began their journey.

“Pastoralism is that way of life adapted to the efficient use of available resources and to adapting to what exists in a way that does not harm the system and often improves it,” says Fernandez-Gimenez. “Rather than trying to get rid of them, we need to learn from them, because those lessons will be increasingly important in a changing climate and environment.”

In the mountain pastures of the Picos de Europa, Garzón and the herd spend the summer at ease, waking up to chilly mornings and occasional downpours while the rest of the country suffocates in record heat. They will stay there until the first snowfall, signaling that the time to retrace their steps south has arrived.

“The planet is facing a situation of real social and economic catastrophe,” Garzón says. “But pastoralism will survive.

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The impact of type 1 and type 2 https://deborahjmiller.com/the-impact-of-type-1-and-type-2/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 14:47:21 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/the-impact-of-type-1-and-type-2/ Metabolism refers to the body’s process of extracting energy from food. Diabetes affects metabolism by reducing insulin levels. This in turn prevents the body from storing the energy it gets from food for later use. In type 1 diabetes, this happens because the immune system attacks the cells that make insulin, which are found in […]]]>

Metabolism refers to the body’s process of extracting energy from food. Diabetes affects metabolism by reducing insulin levels. This in turn prevents the body from storing the energy it gets from food for later use.

In type 1 diabetes, this happens because the immune system attacks the cells that make insulin, which are found in the pancreas. In type 2 diabetes, the body stops responding to insulin as well as it should.

In this article, we’ll take a closer look at diabetes and metabolism.

Metabolism is the process by which the body creates energy of the food and drink that a person consumes.

After eating, the body begins to break down carbohydrates, proteins and fats in order to release energy. The body then uses this energy to maintain the functioning of organs and biological processes.

There are three main ways that the body consumes energy:

  • Resting energy expenditure: This is the energy the body uses while at rest. It is similar to the Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR), which is the energy the body needs for its most basic and essential functions, such as breathing.
  • Energy expenditure induced by food: This is the energy that a person uses for digestion. Another term for this is the thermal effect of food.
  • Energy expenditure induced by activity: This is the energy that someone uses for physical activity. The more active a person is, the higher the energy expenditure.

People who have a slow metabolism generally have a low BMR. This means they require fewer calories at rest than someone with a faster metabolism or high BMR.

Many factors can increase or decrease BMR, including:

  • muscular mass
  • bone size and density
  • body fat
  • age, because muscle mass tends to decrease as people get older
  • genetic

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder, which means that it directly affects the body’s ability to release and store energy from food. This happens due to problems with the production of insulin.

When a person eats carbohydrates, the body begins to break them down into their simplest form, which is glucose. This glucose then enters the bloodstream, providing energy to the body’s cells.

Usually, if the blood sugar is too high, the pancreas releases insulin. This hormone tells the liver to remove glucose from the blood and turn it into glycogen, which the body can use later.

However, in people with diabetes, insulin levels get lower than they should be. This leaves high levels of glucose in the blood, which can lead to serious consequences if left untreated.

There are two main types of diabetes:

Type 1 diabetes

In type 1 diabetes, a person has very weak or absent insulin levels. This happens because the immune system mistakenly attacks the cells in the pancreas that make it. Therefore, people with type 1 diabetes need insulin injections throughout their lives.

People are usually diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in childhood or when they are young adults. It counts for 5-10% of all cases of diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes

In people with type 2 diabetes, the body also stops responding to insulin, resulting in high blood sugar. Over time, the pancreas produces increasing amounts of insulin to try to keep up.

This creates a deficit, where the body does not have the ability to manage the amount of glucose in the blood. Eventually, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin exhausted.

Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1 and represents 90% of all cases of diabetes.

In addition to carbohydrates, the body can use protein for energy. In some situations, the body can break down proteins in its own muscles to produce energy. Experts call this catabolism.

An older article from 2008 notes that people with type 1 diabetes who don’t get enough insulin from their medications can undergo catabolism, resulting in a significant reduction in muscle mass. This same effect does not occur in people with type 2 diabetes.

When a person has enough insulin, their body is able to efficiently use and store glucose.

However, without insulin, the body can use stored fat instead. This happens through a process that experts call ketosis.

During ketosis, the body releases ketones, which are chemicals that are broken down from fat. If the ketone levels get too high, they can make the blood acidic. This results in a serious condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).

ACD mainly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes, but it can also develop in people with type 2 diabetes. It is a life-threatening condition that requires emergency treatment.

Blood ketone monitors or urine test strips can help people check their ketone levels.

Learn more about the symptoms of ACD here.

Diet, exercise and body weight have a significant influence on metabolism and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Diet

Eating a diet high in simple carbohydrates that digest quickly and provide more energy than a person needs can raise blood sugar.

If the levels remain high over time, the body may not be able to produce enough insulin to lower them to a healthy level. This in turn can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes.

In addition, simple carbohydrates are not as nutritious as other foods, despite their high energy content. This can mean that people are hungrier and eat more food as a result, which further increases blood sugar levels.

Simple carbohydrates are found in foods that are high in sugar, such as candy, sugary drinks, and ice cream.

Complex carbohydrates take longer to break down and release their energy over a longer period of time. These include foods such as whole grains, beans, and vegetables that are high in fiber.

Exercise

When a person exercises or other physical activity, their activity-induced energy expenditure increases. This means that the body can use the glucose circulating in the blood, thereby lowering blood sugar.

Strengthening exercises can also build muscle. Muscle cells need energy even when not in use, so the more muscle a person has, the more calories they burn while at rest.

Weight

Body weight also has an impact on metabolism.

High body weight increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by making the body’s cells less sensitive to insulin. This means that the cells will not store excess glucose as efficiently, which will increase the risk of hyperglycemia.

A combination of being overweight, eating a diet high in simple carbohydrates, and low levels of physical activity can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes.

Insulin medications stimulate muscles, liver, and fat cells to absorb and store glucose as glycogen. When this happens, a person’s blood sugar drops.

In people with diabetes, the goal is to achieve a balance between insulin and blood sugar. This means that a person has enough energy ready for use, but not to the point of risking long-term health complications.

Using too much insulin can lower blood sugar to dangerous levels, causing hypoglycemia. Not using enough will cause hyperglycemia.

Diabetes impairs the body’s metabolism, affecting the way it processes and stores energy. This happens due to a lack of insulin, a hormone that controls the amount of glucose in the blood.

If there is not enough insulin, blood sugar can get too high, leading to a series of problems over time.

Exercising, strengthening muscles, and achieving or maintaining a moderate weight can improve blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes by increasing BMR and insulin sensitivity.

Complex carbohydrates can also help keep blood sugar stable throughout the day.


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Food Waste Is Preventable, Says Purdue Panel | Campus https://deborahjmiller.com/food-waste-is-preventable-says-purdue-panel-campus/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 00:46:00 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/food-waste-is-preventable-says-purdue-panel-campus/ In a panel dedicated to discussing food waste and ways to alleviate it, the Purdue Student Government and city officials said food waste is preventable and steps to address the problem have already been taken. taken. The panel took place Wednesday evening at the Wilmeth Active Learning Center on Wednesday evening. It was hosted by […]]]>

In a panel dedicated to discussing food waste and ways to alleviate it, the Purdue Student Government and city officials said food waste is preventable and steps to address the problem have already been taken. taken.

The panel took place Wednesday evening at the Wilmeth Active Learning Center on Wednesday evening. It was hosted by PSG, the City of West Lafayette and the West Lafayette Go Greener Commission, and was moderated by Lindsey Payne, Director of Service Learning and Assistant Professor of Environmental and Ecological Engineering Practice.

Food waste is preventable

Payne pointed out, along with Abigail Engelberth, Associate Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering and Environmental and Ecological Engineering, that although food loss and food waste are two separate issues, food waste is preventable.

“There are 38.4 million tonnes of food waste every year and commercial resources are among the main factors,” Engelberth said. “Industrial food waste is a small part, but it is really punctual and it is homogeneous.”

Engelberth’s presentation focused on how industrial processing has the most potential to reduce its food waste, even though it only accounts for 5% of all food waste. The homogeneity of the waste makes it easier to collect it because it is more predictable.

“It doesn’t need a collection system as complex as residential food waste,” Engelberth said. “Industries can (move similar garbage) from place to place. It will also always be the same type of things to come – there won’t be any chicken when you’re ready for the cauliflower.

There is also a lot of potential income in food that has been wasted, she said, and depending on the specific waste, “it can be turned into something much more valuable.”

The anaerobic digester

David Henderson, West Lafayette’s director of utilities, explained how the city implemented an anaerobic digester to tackle food waste.

The digester underwent a major renovation in 2008, and after a compost project at Purdue failed due to odor issues, a partnership was formed between West Lafayette and the university to ensure all food waste was sent to the anaerobic digester.

“There are food waste deliveries five days a week,” said Henderson. “But the food courts have reduced waste significantly because there is no food wasted if you don’t have people using the facilities or using take out containers.

“There are still things put in place last year when the campus reopened that still apply, but no matter how you receive your meals, if food waste can go to sewage treatment plants, this is the best place. ”

After going through the anaerobic digester and becoming stable, the waste “goes to a retention lagoon, then to a farm and returns nitrogen, phosphorus and other nutrients to the earth,” he said. declared.

“We are trying to create a circular economy,” said Henderson. “It is a partnership and it does not charge the university anything.”

“Where there is food, there is waste”

The last panelist to speak was Madison Hodges, senior agricultural engineering and member of the Go Greener Commission and the Purdue Student Sustainability Council. She highlighted how the use of take-out containers has lowered food waste conversion rates.

“As we move into post-COVID, or the new normal, it’s important that we use the infrastructure that is already in place,” Hodges said. “Where there are students there is food and where there is food there is waste. “

She said seven sororities, fraternities and co-ops send their waste to the anaerobic digester, diverting “12,000 pounds of food in the 2019-20 school year.”

“There is a huge opportunity for growth (there),” Hodges said. “We have 64 homes on campus that could be involved.

“A waste collection system is in place. Some of them only accumulate in the kitchen and others are scratched. We also provide signage, educational materials, and present at home to inform them of proper procedures such as not contaminating food waste entering the processor.

There is also a community repository, and the Go Greener Commission is working to identify future locations to be installed in the coming months.

While some sororities, fraternities, and co-op houses have a deposit system, Purdue Residences does not. Hodges said the main reason for this was logistics, as “it’s more work for the janitorial staff and the waste management team.”

“We have ‘PSSC Clear Waste’ training in mess rooms,” she said. “Previously there were food scuff marks in the food courts and they weighed (the food that was scratched) and shamed everyone for raising awareness and only taking what you’re actually going to eat.

“Recently, they had a project with benefits for the food-free plates. Usually, the conveyor belts are really full, but if the students are eating all of their food, they should put their plates at the top level of the conveyor belt on the green platters.

Hodges that while there is still a lot of work to be done, students can still make a difference in the way food waste is handled at Purdue and the Grand Lafayette area.

“As students we can defend,” she said, “and we should be working with the staff and faculty at Purdue rather than working against the machine. Just jump in and make a move. little lifting of heavy loads. “

Throwing away food prematurely

Jen-Yi Huang, Associate Professor of Food Science, explained how food labels can be misleading due to lack of regulation, confusing consumers and resulting in wastage or loss of around 33-50% food produced for humans.

“Edible food that is thrown away prematurely and unnecessarily is food waste,” Huang said. “The average American wastes 20 pounds of food a month. I wish I could lose 20 pounds a month, but I can’t.

Huang reviewed the typical labels that people would see in a grocery store and their true meaning in terms of impact on the food purchased. Only one percent of consumers know that date labels are only regulated for specific foods, he said.

“’Expires on’ or ‘Use by before’ means that the food may not be safe to eat after the stated date, so you can take that as a safety indicator,” he said. “Best if used by” or “Best if used by” is the manufacturer’s recommendation for optimal quality foods. It won’t kill you, but you don’t really have to throw it away.

“” Sell by “is intended for inventory management in grocery stores. They just want to make sure the number of days the product is out, and then they’re going to run it.

The grocery stores themselves will guess if these are products with a longer shelf life, Huang said.

“Even processed foods can be a year past the date and it’s okay,” he said. “Now that doesn’t mean go get some old eggs and have dinner. They must be stored correctly and cooked properly. And make sure they have nothing unusual before they eat. “

He asked consumers to download the Foodkeeper app published by foodsafety.gov, where users can check specific foods and see if they can still be eaten.

“Take-out may not be scientific, but trust your senses with the food you eat,” Huang said. “Trust your senses, not your gut. “


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Another renowned brewery lands in Ballard and 4 more new bar openings in Seattle https://deborahjmiller.com/another-renowned-brewery-lands-in-ballard-and-4-more-new-bar-openings-in-seattle/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/another-renowned-brewery-lands-in-ballard-and-4-more-new-bar-openings-in-seattle/ Bale Breaker Brewing Co. and Yonder Cider tasting room 826 NW 49th St., Ballard, Seattle; bbycballard.com This long-awaited tasting room finally makes its debut in trendy Ballard Beer, with a 6,200 square foot facility that includes a backyard with fire pits. Expect outdoor film screenings in the future. Children and dogs are allowed here. Likely […]]]>

Bale Breaker Brewing Co. and Yonder Cider tasting room

826 NW 49th St., Ballard, Seattle; bbycballard.com

This long-awaited tasting room finally makes its debut in trendy Ballard Beer, with a 6,200 square foot facility that includes a backyard with fire pits. Expect outdoor film screenings in the future. Children and dogs are allowed here. Likely due to all the fatigue associated with the COVID-19 lockdown, Ballard’s beer gardens have been crowded in recent months with long waiting lists. This new outdoor space should bring some relief. The 32 beer and hard cider taps showcase Yakima hops and Wenatchee apples. Bale Breaker also makes some of the best fresh hop beers in the area and is expected to release a few batches in the coming weeks. There’s even an on-site still for owners to play with, so expect apple brandy, gin, and whiskey in the future.

Station 18 Eat & Drink

5425 Russell Avenue NW, Ballard, Seattle; station18ballard.com

This Ballard bar is located in a historic monument that once housed a fire station. In recent years, this space housed Hi-Life bar and then Valentinetti’s restaurant, and it has now reverted to a bar under new owners Kate Barrett, of Kate’s Pub, and Erik Nilsen. The 148-seat space includes a patio where dogs are allowed. Children are welcome in the dining room until 9 p.m. The food is described by management as ‘backyard barbecue’ flavors, with smoked and grilled meats including burnt pork belly ends, burgers, tacos, and pizza. There are 12 craft beers on tap as well as two giant screens and five televisions for watching the games. The owners are delaying opening on Sunday until they can find more help in the kitchen.

La Taverne Victor

2121 Sixth Avenue, Denny Triangle, Seattle; 206-649-4040, ethanstowellrestaurants.com/locations/victor-tavern

Ethan Stowell takes over Tom Douglas’ former Via6 restaurant space, across from the Amazon Spheres. Its 2,500 square foot restaurant and bar features a heated terrace and two bars, including a mezzanine with pool tables, shuffleboard and other table games. Children are allowed in the dining room. The 200-seat Victor Tavern, with 10 TVs to watch all Seahawks, Kraken, and college games, targets office workers and residents of nearby apartments. Lots of burgers and sandwiches like crab roll and French dip, and the daily happy hour runs from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. with $ 8 cocktails and small platters such as beef tartare. Talented bartender Erik Carlson, who made up the craft cocktail list here, now oversees the alcohol program for all Stowell’s restaurants.

Snowy River Cocktail Co

2800 E. Madison St., Madison Park, Seattle; 206-402-5486 snowyrivercocktailbars.com

This Bellingham-based bar lands on Madison Park’s main drag, with plans to have a $ 12 burger and beer night on Wednesdays, while hosting comedic improv and live music the other nights. The range of 30 cocktails ranges from a rum-watermelon cocktail to a chocolate martini, with shared platters such as baked brie and shrimp ceviche. The 83-seat bar also has a covered and heated terrace that can accommodate 40 more in winter. Children are allowed in the dining room until 9 p.m. Snowy River Cocktail Co also serves as a retail outlet, selling sugars and rim salts and other cocktail ingredients for your home bar.

Tony T Sports Lounge

1518 First Ave. S., Sodo, Seattle; 206-577-7096, tonytssportslounge.com

This sports bar across from T-Mobile Park aims to be the go-to place for all games. Located in the former Henry’s Tavern space, Tony T’s has 19 flat screens and management plans to subscribe to all premium sports packages so sports fans can request any game. Tony T’s has an extensive menu. Bar including basics like burgers and wings with $ 6 margaritas during weekday happy hour (3 p.m. to 6 p.m.). Plans are underway to add a beer garden. The sports bar was also a meeting place for spectators from the nearby WAMU theater and the SoDo Showbox.


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Mary Washington University Cultural Series https://deborahjmiller.com/mary-washington-university-cultural-series/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 20:07:59 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/mary-washington-university-cultural-series/ Through a collaborative effort of students, food services and the campus multicultural center, the University of Mary Washington hosts a dozen events celebrating different ethnic and cultural groups each year. In the decade since its launch, the series has always been a fan favorite among college students at the Fredericksburg, Virginia campus. The college catering […]]]>

Through a collaborative effort of students, food services and the campus multicultural center, the University of Mary Washington hosts a dozen events celebrating different ethnic and cultural groups each year. In the decade since its launch, the series has always been a fan favorite among college students at the Fredericksburg, Virginia campus.

The college catering service, a Sodexo account, is working with the school’s James Farmer Multicultural Center (JFMC) to host special meals in support of the centre’s cultural awareness series. The series is designed to promote a deeper understanding and appreciation of race, gender, nationality, sexual orientation, religion, age and culture. Besides food, it includes performances, lectures, forums and other presentations.

Photo: In addition to a menu featuring dishes from tribes from various regions such as the Sonoran Desert, Northern Plains, Southeastern and Northeastern Tribes, Grill Cook Teddy Harrison, who is of origin cherokee, wore his tribal badges and spoke with guests about his heritage.

Special culinary events involve a number of stakeholders: Sodexo Executive Chef Peter Stine, representatives from JFMC or specific student cultural groups and Marketing Manager Rose Benedict, who originated the idea with Stine. . Sometimes individual students or catering staff who are intimately familiar with the culture highlighted are also involved in setting the menu.

“These gastronomic events were created to use culinary experiences to help promote the core values ​​of Sodexo and the university of promoting diversity and inclusion,” said Benedict. “We think it’s very important to take every possible opportunity to raise awareness and appreciate other cultures,” she adds. “What better way to do this than through our common love of good food? “

The key, she notes, is to do it in a way that avoids distorting or hijacking other cultures. This is where the help of the JFMC and student cultural clubs was essential.

“In my opinion,” says Benedict, “we could not be successful in creating this kind of restoration program without the direct contribution of members of the university community who have these cultural backgrounds. We never tell our customers what their culture should be like in terms of food; we listen to them.

Sometimes students bring their favorite family recipes from home. More recently, Stine recognized the opportunity to include additional contributions from members of the restoration team, who represent a cross section of cultures. He began to include them in the planning process of each event, soliciting their input on menus, recipes and general presentations.

A recent Islamic cultural celebration dinner, for example, was planned and executed by Hind Abulali, a Jordanian pastry chef, who shared her joy and enthusiasm for her culture with the restaurant team, students and other guests. The menu included Saudi kabsa and Lebanese kafta made with halal meat, Moroccan mashed potatoes, tabouli, halal chicken with Saudi rice, halal roast beef with seven spices and several Middle Eastern desserts. East.

Raymunda_Rauer_cooking300_2.pngPhoto: Raymunda Rauer, a dining supervisor from the Philippines, prepared her family recipe for Filipino pancit and wore a traditional Filipino costume while serving dinner.

Special events – some lunches, some dinners – take over the university’s main dining hall at Top of the UC, an all-you-can-eat restaurant with various service outlets. They are mainly promoted through social media and flyers, and the food costs are about the same as for normal menus.

While students and staff have a say in menu development, “we help guide them based on availability and the seasons of the day, so that we can deliver the best quality,” says David Schneider, director of catering at the university. “We are trying to achieve that authentic flavor profile to represent the culture.” The biggest challenge in hosting these special events lately has been Covid – sometimes the food service hasn’t been convenient, and these lovingly prepared meals have been packed in take-out containers. As a result, some students left with five or six take-out boxes from different stations.

“This year, we think the biggest challenge will be to keep the students away,” Schneider jokes. Events draw larger than average crowds and require advance planning and additional assistance from the student catering ambassadors and members of the cultural groups involved in the specific occasion. These volunteers help keep the lines moving and sometimes serve food. While the establishment adheres to its no-limit policy, portion control for certain items is a must for items like fried foods to ensure everyone in line gets a taste.

Benedict says the program has strengthened the restaurant services global partnership with the university and created goodwill among its diverse student body and staff. “We have a lot of professors here from other countries and a lot of international students, and we always look forward to their comments,” said Benedict.

“Through this series, we have demonstrated how a campus catering operation can successfully host multicultural catering events that are truly inclusive, from concept to final execution, and that elevate and support the vision, mission and the values ​​of the university, ”said Benedict.


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Ohio Oil and Gas Association Volleyball Game Raises $ 10,000 for Ohio Valley Food Bank | News, Sports, Jobs https://deborahjmiller.com/ohio-oil-and-gas-association-volleyball-game-raises-10000-for-ohio-valley-food-bank-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 04:21:54 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/ohio-oil-and-gas-association-volleyball-game-raises-10000-for-ohio-valley-food-bank-news-sports-jobs/ Photo provided Members of the Ohio Oil and Gas Association play volleyball on Friday in the association’s third annual charity game. This year’s “Volley for the Valley” game was held at Sally Buffalo Park in Cadiz and raised over $ 10,000 for the Mid-Ohio Food Bank. The Ohio Oil and Gas Association raised over $ […]]]>

Photo provided Members of the Ohio Oil and Gas Association play volleyball on Friday in the association’s third annual charity game. This year’s “Volley for the Valley” game was held at Sally Buffalo Park in Cadiz and raised over $ 10,000 for the Mid-Ohio Food Bank.

The Ohio Oil and Gas Association raised over $ 10,000 for the Mid-Ohio Food Bank at its annual charity event.

In recent years, the association has organized a charity event in the Ohio Valley to benefit various organizations. This year’s “Volley for the Valley” event was a volleyball game at Sally Buffalo Park in Cadiz. In 2019, a softball game was held in Belmont County; and last year there was a kickball game in Jefferson County.

Mike Chadsey, public relations director for the Ohio Oil and Gas Association, said they had raised more than $ 50,000 for local charities since the start of the annual event. The money has already helped the Appalachian Foundation for its books program and local county emergency management agencies to help fight COVID-19. This year, the funds will be donated to the Mid-Ohio Food Bank to help address food insecurity in local pantries in eastern and southeastern Ohio.

“It was our third annual game,” he said. “We know our business and our members have assets in different counties, so we are moving them. Everyone loves to play different games, so we change every year. The game is really just a mechanic to help raise money for charities, and we’re having fun doing it. ”

Chadsey said he raised more than $ 10,000 at this year’s event, with the association covering the expenses. He said all money raised at the event will go directly to the Mid-Ohio Food Bank.

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Woody’s pizza owner speaks after driver says he was in elevator that fell 7 floors https://deborahjmiller.com/woodys-pizza-owner-speaks-after-driver-says-he-was-in-elevator-that-fell-7-floors/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 20:37:30 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/woodys-pizza-owner-speaks-after-driver-says-he-was-in-elevator-that-fell-7-floors/ A video shared this weekend by a restaurant in Lubbock shows one of his delivery drivers apparently rescued from an elevator after saying he fell seven floors before being stopped by emergency brakes on Saturday evening. As of Monday afternoon, the smartphone video, which Woody’s Brick Oven Pizza posted to Facebook on Saturday evening, had […]]]>

A video shared this weekend by a restaurant in Lubbock shows one of his delivery drivers apparently rescued from an elevator after saying he fell seven floors before being stopped by emergency brakes on Saturday evening.

As of Monday afternoon, the smartphone video, which Woody’s Brick Oven Pizza posted to Facebook on Saturday evening, had been viewed more than 6,400 times.

It shows the delivery driver communicating with his wife by phone as he waits for a Lubbock fire crew to open the elevator door to let him out of the elevator in the private Raider Park parking lot along the Marsha Sharp Highway.

Following:Lubbock council approves budget with police pay increases and more street funding

Woody’s initial Facebook post indicates that their driver was doing fine after the incident.

“Okay, our driver is safe. He fell 7 floors until the emergency brakes engaged in the elevator at the roof bar. The fire department told him he was 3ft for (sic) crashing downstairs. The phone in the elevator was locked and none of the emergency buttons worked. So since he’s our late night driver, we call him one night. He’s a little exhausted. See you tomorrow, “the message read.

Video shows it was taken around 10:30 p.m., which would have been right after Texas Tech’s home football game against Florida International University across the freeway at Jones AT&T Stadium.

Tanner Rodriguez, one of the restaurant’s owners, told the Avalanche-Journal on Monday that the incident occurred after the delivery driver dropped off an order for food to customers on the rooftop bar.

“He messaged through our work chat to let us know and that’s when we decided to call 911,” Rodriguez said.

He acknowledged that the post had sparked a great wave of concern and interest. But the cause of the elevator malfunction was not immediately clear.


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Nutritionist Pooja Makhjia reveals the secret to lasting weight loss https://deborahjmiller.com/nutritionist-pooja-makhjia-reveals-the-secret-to-lasting-weight-loss/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 08:35:06 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/nutritionist-pooja-makhjia-reveals-the-secret-to-lasting-weight-loss/ Weight loss: strike a balance between eating and cheating, says nutritionist When embarking on a weight loss journey, many often completely eliminate many of their favorite foods. However, it becomes difficult to follow this. Celebrity nutritionist Pooja Makhija shared the secret to weight loss and long-term management in a new Instagram post. In the caption, […]]]>

Weight loss: strike a balance between eating and cheating, says nutritionist

When embarking on a weight loss journey, many often completely eliminate many of their favorite foods. However, it becomes difficult to follow this. Celebrity nutritionist Pooja Makhija shared the secret to weight loss and long-term management in a new Instagram post. In the caption, she wrote: “Healthy weight loss should always be a balance – 80-90% of the time, eat right, eat thinking – then 10-20% let the game come in where you (cheat) eat along with some of your favorite food. That’s the reason. It’s a lifestyle. It’s forever. “

Want to maintain your weight loss? Follow these tips

She used white rice (in a tall glass) and red rice (in a small glass) to explain the idea. First, she takes a large glass full of white rice and begins to pour it on a plate. She says, metaphorically, that white rice here represents everyone’s intentions of sticking to their meal plan – “following a healthy lifestyle, a balanced plate, no carbohydrate omissions, regular exercise from time to time and a healthier day to day.

She then takes a comparatively smaller amount of red rice in a container and starts putting it on the white. She says red rice represents “all of that tricks and a little bit of deviation that tends to creep in from time to time.” The idea is not to live a life of austerity where everything is good or bad, she advises. Therefore, a fair mix of the two is ideal, where most of the time we eat thoughtfully, and on a few occasions we eat to please the taste buds.

She mixes the two together and says, “Balance is what keeps us sane. However, whichever prevails, you will live a life where you are the boss or, unfortunately, people like me and the doctors are. “.

Watch the video :

Over a month ago, Pooja shared tips on training the mind to stay consistent and continue the weight loss journey. His advice was to stop eating emotionally before it turns into binge eating. For more on what she said about staying consistent on the path to weight loss, click here.

In short, the foundations of a healthy lifestyle are good nutrition and regular physical activity. Don’t go overboard with either, and you’ll find yourself hitting your fitness goals quite comfortably.

(Pooja Makhija is a nutritionist, dietician and author)

Disclaimer: This content, including the tips, provides generic information only. It does not in any way replace qualified medical advice. Always consult a specialist or your own doctor for more information. NDTV does not claim responsibility for this information.



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Resumption of mandatory sampling for chronic wasting disease at the start of the deer season https://deborahjmiller.com/resumption-of-mandatory-sampling-for-chronic-wasting-disease-at-the-start-of-the-deer-season/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 20:45:43 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/resumption-of-mandatory-sampling-for-chronic-wasting-disease-at-the-start-of-the-deer-season/ As deer season has begun, chronic wasting disease continues to be of concern to many, including wildlife managers, hunters, and others. The disease, commonly known as CWD, ends up killing any deer it infects and can spread throughout the environment. CWD was first found in the Missouri free-range deer population in 2012 and has been […]]]>

As deer season has begun, chronic wasting disease continues to be of concern to many, including wildlife managers, hunters, and others.

The disease, commonly known as CWD, ends up killing any deer it infects and can spread throughout the environment. CWD was first found in the Missouri free-range deer population in 2012 and has been found in 18 counties, according to the Missouri Department of Conservation. The disease remains “relatively rare in the state”, being detected in 206 deer out of more than 152,300 tested by the MDC since 2012.

The contagious disease is deadly for white-tailed deer, said wildlife biologist Jasmine Batten, who is also the wildlife health program supervisor for the MDC.

“When deer are infected, they can throw it into water and food,” Batten said. “This disease can remain active and infectious for a very long time. “

A closer look at chronic wasting disease

The disease is specific to the deer family, which also includes elk.

“We don’t know of any evidence of its transmission to other species, including humans, but it belongs to the same family of diseases as mad cow disease, which is a bovine or bovine disease,” Batten said.

Among the 44 new cases of chronic wasting disease found in Missouri deer last season was this sick deer.  The MDC determined that the deer showed signs of CWD infection and was euthanized by MDC staff.  Screening for cervid encephalopathy confirmed the diagnosis.

Due to health concerns and recommendations related to the COVID-19 pandemic, the MDC has suspended mandatory sampling regulations for the opening weekend of the 2020 gun season.

Following:White-tailed deer can catch COVID, USDA reports. What does this mean for Missouri hunters?

“Normally over that two day period we test about 20,000 deer,” Batten said.

MDC was able to test more than 15,000 deer again, thanks to partnerships with taxidermists and meat processors across the state. Earlier this year, the ministry proposed adding four more counties to the MDC management area while reinstating mandatory sampling requirements.



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