Food management – Deborah J Miller http://deborahjmiller.com/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 12:27:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://deborahjmiller.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-35-150x150.png Food management – Deborah J Miller http://deborahjmiller.com/ 32 32 Texas Winter Weather 2022: How to Prepare for Another Snowstorm https://deborahjmiller.com/texas-winter-weather-2022-how-to-prepare-for-another-snowstorm/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/texas-winter-weather-2022-how-to-prepare-for-another-snowstorm/ Sign up for The Brief, our daily newsletter that keeps readers up to date with Texas’ most essential news. The winter storm of last February marked a severe weather event unlike any Texans had seen in decades, leaving millions of people without power and in freezing conditions. Within days of the storm and its aftermath, […]]]>

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The Senior Center in Verona takes over several services from Belleville | Community https://deborahjmiller.com/the-senior-center-in-verona-takes-over-several-services-from-belleville-community/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 19:25:00 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/the-senior-center-in-verona-takes-over-several-services-from-belleville-community/ Older people in the city of Verona now have access to services closer to their homes. After having to use the Sugar River Elderly Center in the village of Belleville, residents of the city of Verona can now use the Verona Elderly Center in the same way as residents of the city of Verona since […]]]>

Older people in the city of Verona now have access to services closer to their homes.

After having to use the Sugar River Elderly Center in the village of Belleville, residents of the city of Verona can now use the Verona Elderly Center in the same way as residents of the city of Verona since the 1st January.

“It makes more sense, I think, that these people come here, we are physically closer,” Stephanie Ehle, director of the Verona Senior Center, told reporters.

There are three services which will now be operated by the Verona center instead of Belleville, she said. These are food, case management and transportation.

Monday, January 3 was the first day for Verona to serve meals on wheels to residents of the city of Verona, and there were around seven or eight new people at VSC who were traveling to Belleville for the service, Ehle said.

“From what the city of Verona shared, Meals on Wheels was going to have the biggest impact on us,” she said. “We have reorganized our routes, but it went well. “

Verona staff initially plan to recruit 20 more people per day across all of their nutrition departments, Ehle said.

The Verona center had been in discussions with the Belleville center for some time ahead of this week’s transition, she said, asking for data on the number of people they had served, so the transition would go smoothly .

It took a lot of coordination to get a feel for where the new Meals on Wheels customers were and print out new driving routes.

“It took a bit of planning to make sure we had the information so that we were ready to help serve,” Ehle said. “They provided data but were concerned about whether we will treat all of their customers with care – which we obviously will – but it’s hard for them to lose these people.”

Residents of the city of Verona will now get the management of their fighters from the city’s two case managers, Julie Larson and Drake Deno.

“Our team reached out to everyone and introduced themselves, and it seems like a welcome change from what we can say,” Ehle said of the new clients. “I think it went pretty well.”

The Belleville center case manager has also contacted clients about the change.

People can use case managers for a variety of services such as helping with resources when they move, helping with the transition from home to nursing, or if they are food insecure, said Ehle.

The Verona city administration helped by sending information to residents about services that would be supported by the city center from January 1, Ehle said.

“Much of this communication has been done from their side,” she said.

And residents of the city of Verona who were not or are not already receiving services in Belleville will be sent to Verona if they unknowingly contact Belleville, she said.

As the Verona center anticipates an increase in deliveries and in-home meals, it recently lost its nutritional coordinator, Ehle said.

The center had just increased the part-time hours to a full-time position from 40 hours per week, but the coordinator resigned.

For now, the center is filling this vacancy with internal staff and volunteers, but is actively recruiting a full-time Nutrition Coordinator.

Fortunately, the center partners with TnT’s Catering out in Middleton for all the cooking, and the coordinator’s role is more to distribute meals. Which – given that the center distributes over 80 meals on certain days – it wouldn’t be able to sustain it if it had to prepare the meals as well, Ehle said.

For home meal delivery, there was no deviation despite the loss of the nutrition coordinator, just a few pitfalls such as providing the wrong type of cookie for dessert – for which the staff apologize and promise to. do well next time, said Ehle.

For now, the center also doesn’t really advertise its group meals – in part because of the rise of the Omicron variant in COVID-19, but also because the center is aiming this year to transform meals into a ‘grab’ n ‘go format, so customers have a meal and then go to an event such as a movie screening or a game of bingo.

In part, this will help food insecure people integrate further, Ehle said. But it will also make it harder to visualize the increase in customers coming from downtown Belleville, she said.

In addition to meals, transport services and case management, people who live in the city of Verona, the city of Verona or Belleville can come to either center for classes, workshops and programs. There are no limits set for these offers, Ehle said.

“We are delighted to welcome people from the city of Verona,” she said. “But since everyone was welcome to participate in programs here before, I’m not sure there will be a big wave of people. “

As for the increase in the number of people using the center as the number of COVID-19 cases increased, Ehle said his staff was approaching 2022 “calmly and cautiously.”

Between COVID-19, it’s flu season, and them being down on the nutrition coordinator position, they’ve had to shift gears a bit, she said.

“We have a light first trimester, but our ‘light’ is still a bit heavy compared to other senior centers,” she said. “We try to plan a bit ahead to save resources and time, and to be more organized with how we do things. We move forward as if we want to be normal.


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SF to convert huge UN Plaza building into service center by mid-January https://deborahjmiller.com/sf-to-convert-huge-un-plaza-building-into-service-center-by-mid-january/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:15:00 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/sf-to-convert-huge-un-plaza-building-into-service-center-by-mid-january/ San Francisco will convert a vacant seven-story commercial building on UN Plaza into a service center that will provide a place for people to get off the streets of Tenderloin and receive referrals to temporary shelter, transitional housing, mental health treatment and drug addiction – one in a series of measures taken by the Mayor […]]]>

San Francisco will convert a vacant seven-story commercial building on UN Plaza into a service center that will provide a place for people to get off the streets of Tenderloin and receive referrals to temporary shelter, transitional housing, mental health treatment and drug addiction – one in a series of measures taken by the Mayor of London Breed to tackle the opioid epidemic.

The Emergency Management Department, which is leading the response to the crisis, has signed a lease for the building at 1170 Market Street and hopes to open it in two weeks. The center will also have a tent outside.

The center will provide food, clothing, toilets, hand washing stations and portable showers brought in regularly, as well as referrals to mental health care, addiction treatment, temporary winter shelter and transitional housing. It will also provide homeless people with bus tickets to reunite with friends or family members who live out of town. References to food aid, therapy, employment support and childcare will also be available.

The service center is part of a controversial effort Breed announced last month to tackle crime and overdose in the net. Residents, activists and business owners urged the mayor to take aggressive action to deal with a crisis that worsened during the pandemic.



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North Bay State Assembly race draws 3rd candidate https://deborahjmiller.com/north-bay-state-assembly-race-draws-3rd-candidate/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 20:22:55 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/north-bay-state-assembly-race-draws-3rd-candidate/ A Sonoma County contractor will participate in the June 7 primary to replace MP Marc Levine. “I want to take the work I’ve done at the community level to another level,” said Steve Schwartz of Sebastopol, who founded the Interfaith Sustainable Food Collaborative in 2012 and California FarmLink in 1998. Schwartz, 56, executive director of […]]]>

A Sonoma County contractor will participate in the June 7 primary to replace MP Marc Levine.

“I want to take the work I’ve done at the community level to another level,” said Steve Schwartz of Sebastopol, who founded the Interfaith Sustainable Food Collaborative in 2012 and California FarmLink in 1998.

Schwartz, 56, executive director of the food program, is the first person living outside of Marin to participate in the race.

Marin County Supervisor Damon Connolly and Sara Aminzadeh, a lawyer with the California Coastal Commission, announced in the fall that they would join the race.

Levine, a Democrat from Greenbrae, has decided to forgo the possibility of a sixth and final term in the Legislature to run for the post of state insurance commissioner, a post held by Ricardo Lara, a fellow Democrat. . Levine is nearing the end of his term.

Much of the work Schwartz has done over the past 25 years with leading nonprofits is about producing healthy food.

The Interfaith Sustainable Food Collaborative aims to connect religious people to a food system through their congregations and to expand the sustainable agricultural movement to improve public policies. The collaboration has fostered the development of community gardens by Buddhist, Christian, Muslim and Jewish congregations.

Schwartz founded California FarmLink with the goal of helping farmers access land and capital. He organized a program to help beginning farmers save money for equipment and assets needed to grow their business. Securing bank capital, FarmLink has matched farmers’ savings three to one.

Schwartz’s work in the area of ​​food production has included working with land trusts. He said training provided by FarmLink in 2009 led the Marin Agricultural Land Trust to add language to their easements requiring development protected lands to continue to be used for agriculture.

Schwartz said he would like some of the money from Measure A to continue to be used to help fund MALT easements.

Schwartz’s father was one of the youngest children to survive the Auschwitz concentration camp. The elder Schwartz grew up on a small farm in Czechoslovakia and arrived in the United States with a suitcase full of food.

“We learned from our father how crucial it is for people to have something to eat,” Schwartz said.

Andy Naja-Riese, Managing Director of the Marin Agricultural Institute, said: “Steve is a truly thoughtful, dedicated and accessible leader who strives to build a better food and agricultural system in the face of growing inequalities in the face of hunger. I am delighted that we have a local organic farmer applying for a position to serve our farmers, food manufacturers and eaters in North Bay.

Schwartz holds a BA in Economics, Politics and Government from the University of Puget Sound and an MA in Public Administration, Intergovernmental Management and Human Resources Management from the University of Southern California.

Schwartz served more than two years in the United States Peace Corps as a community development volunteer.

After Schwartz completed his master’s degree, he spent more than three years working as chief of staff for two members of the State Assembly.

“I have the best training possible to be a member of the Assembly,” said Schwartz. “I was in the room when the agreements were negotiated. I learned how you negotiate a bill and gain the support of committee members to achieve your priorities.

Schwartz has had some experience as an elected official. He served a four-year term on the Gravenstein Union School District Board. The board oversees a K-8 transition school district with an enrollment of approximately 750 students.

Schwartz’s policy proposals extend beyond agriculture. When it comes to addressing the shortage of affordable housing in the state, he said new state laws removing local zoning barriers to new development won’t do the job.

“Just because the state says we need more units doesn’t mean people will be motivated to build the units without the funding they need,” Schwartz said.

One way to provide the necessary funding could be to reduce property taxes for landlords who rent their homes to teachers or other essential workers with low wages, he said.

When asked if he finds the prospect of competing against his two Marin County opponents intimidating, Schwartz noted that 47% of voters in the district are in Sonoma County.

The redistricting of the Assembly District, which was just completed this month, has ruled out the possibility of Santa Rosa Mayor Chris Rogers being a candidate.

“I ended up about 500 feet from the district,” Rogers said.

Regarding Schwartz’s outlook, Rogers said, “Most of what I know of the work he’s done has been more at the state or regional level. I don’t know to what extent this translates into name identification in the district. “

Rogers said Connolly is recognized in the district and Aminzadeh appears to be on the cusp of raising enough funds to advocate for her case with voters.

“The real question is, will Steve be able to raise enough money to tell his story?” Rogers said.

Schwartz believes he will need to raise a minimum of $ 200,000 to be competitive. He declined to say how much he had raised, but said: “I am happy with the progress made so far. We will be able to achieve the goal.


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Boulder County Residents Face Housing Shortage After Marshall Fire https://deborahjmiller.com/boulder-county-residents-face-housing-shortage-after-marshall-fire/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 02:10:00 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/boulder-county-residents-face-housing-shortage-after-marshall-fire/ More than 170 people displaced by the destructive Marshall fire remained in emergency shelters on Thursday, as officials and Good Samaritans scrambled to find more permanent housing for residents of up to 1,000 burned houses . Authorities have urged residents to contact their insurance companies for help covering personal expenses like food and temporary accommodation, […]]]>

More than 170 people displaced by the destructive Marshall fire remained in emergency shelters on Thursday, as officials and Good Samaritans scrambled to find more permanent housing for residents of up to 1,000 burned houses .

Authorities have urged residents to contact their insurance companies for help covering personal expenses like food and temporary accommodation, while a few hotels have slashed prices and the Coloradans have filled social media with information. offers to welcome the evacuees.

Emergency housing efforts have been complicated by the pandemic. A safe haven has been set aside for coronavirus-positive patients, and supply chain issues brought on by the global health crisis could slow reconstruction efforts as parts of Colorado are already plagued by housing shortages and crisis. soaring costs.

“The rental market was already tight initially before this fire,” said Michael Ingoldby, a Superior resident who lost his home in the fire. “If thousands of houses burn down, it will only tighten up. “

A State Restoration Task Force led by the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management began meeting on Friday and will prioritize emergency housing, division spokeswoman Micki Trost said.

Gov. Jared Polis also said he had spoken with President Joe Biden and a Federal Emergency Management Agency administrator about medium-term housing support for residents who wish to care for their children in residential areas. local schools or return to a certain normality before rebuilding the destroyed houses.

“We will work hard with families and small businesses to rebuild our precious communities, homes and shrines for people,” Polis said Friday at a press conference.

Biden verbally endorsed an expedited declaration of major disaster to help with the reconstruction.

FEMA spokeswoman Lynn Kimbrough said they were waiting for the president to formally sign the statement outlining what aid was approved.

More than 500 homes were consumed by the 6,000-acre blaze that started Thursday, fueled by wind gusts of up to 110 miles per hour. If those numbers hold up, it will be the most destructive wildfire in state history in terms of the number of homes burned.

Carole Walker, executive director of the Rocky Mountain Insurance Association, said it was too early to estimate insurance damage from the blaze, but expected it to be the costliest in history. state in terms of insurance claims.

“I don’t even feel like I’m taking any risks on this,” she said, calling the fire a “catastrophic and unprecedented event”.

The tight housing market “can affect the ability of people to find housing, especially if they need it in the longer term,” she said.

She expected the insurance losses to be high as the fire struck a densely populated urban area.

“It’s not the size of the fire for insurance. This is where the fire is occurring, the number of houses in the area, the cost of repairing and rebuilding those houses, ”she said.

Colorado recently opened a transitional accommodation site for Afghan refugees, but Trost said there was no similar long-term accommodation provided for fire victims because they have different needs. Residents typically stay with family or friends for about a week or two after a fire before finding alternative accommodation while long-term repairs are made, she said.

The state hopes to help people without home or tenant insurance and local businesses have offered hotel rooms, she said.

“The first option is to make sure that everyone who is insured is connected and using their insurance benefits, because it is the most efficient and the fastest way to recover,” she said.

Temporary living expenses for food and shelter – money to “get you out of the shelter, to help you out in the short term” – are covered by standard home and tenant insurance policies, Walker said, with the insurance association. Mandatory evacuations trigger insurance coverage, she said.

She expected the insurance coverage to be high as the affected neighborhoods were not second homes in mountainous areas, but mainly primary residences where people have mortgages and insurance is required.

Andrea Carlson of the Colorado and Wyoming Red Cross said the organization operated a shelter at the YMCA of Northern Colorado and did not offer payment for hotel rooms because the shelters were open.

The organization initially focuses on the safety and warmth of people during an emergency response, she said. They then provide cleaning kits and other supplies to help people get back to their homes, and potentially financial assistance to those whose homes have been damaged or destroyed.

“Right now it’s about making sure people are safe, people are fed and people aren’t in the snow in cold weather because it all starts,” she said.

The Red Cross is still providing a long-term response to the Estes Park fires in 2020, she said.

“In fact, I can do something to help”

Meanwhile, residents have offered their help to fire victims on social media and the Airbnb short-term rental platform. The company has a program where hosts can provide free emergency housing to those in need.

“I happen to have vacant accommodation for the next week and a half so I thought… that there is actually something I can do to help people,” said Julia Pamcoe, 39. , who donated a two-bedroom apartment in downtown Boulder to fire victims at no cost.

Pamcoe, who manages properties on Airbnb, was lucky her home and most of her friends’ homes were unharmed, though a tree she loved was blown down on a neighbor’s house. .

Stacy Howard, a Montessori school teacher, offered a room in her family’s four-bedroom house on Facebook after realizing that her property and her family were fine, but their “community (was) shattered. “.

The space is nothing fancy, but enough to keep someone warm, she said.

“It seemed like the easiest, fastest way to post something to feel useful,” she said. “I know if we were in this position that would be the first thing I would worry about… Where are you going to take your kids?” Where are you going to sleep

Howard and his family were evacuated to his mother’s house in Loveland yesterday and returned by car today, staying away from the most damaged neighborhoods to avoid scaring Howard’s elementary-age children.

She was not surprised by the influx of support and offers of help.

“There are a lot of things social media doesn’t do well, but it’s definitely one of them that it does well,” she said.

The DoubleTree hotel in Westminster has been full since 6 p.m. Thursday, after fire evacuees started arriving at 1 p.m., chief executive Angie Harper said. Of 186 rooms, about 120 are now occupied by evacuees, she said, and the hotel has lowered its rate per night from $ 130 to $ 79 for fire victims. They also waive fees for pets.

Last year, the hotel accommodated some 500 people in the Eastern Fire with “all animals known to man,” including lizards, goats and chickens, she said. declared.

“Unfortunately, we have known fire before, but this one is quite different. It happened so fast, ”she said.

In Boulder, the historic Hotel Boulderado was also booked, but not by those evacuated by firefighters.

“We would normally be full tonight because of New Years Eve,” said Rachel Stanford, head of the rooms division.

Colorado Sun writer Jesse Paul contributed to this report.


We believe vital information must be seen by those affected, whether it is a public health crisis, investigative reporting or the empowerment of lawmakers. This report depends on supporting readers like you.


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CT’s 500,000 home test kits not delivered overnight, Thursday’s distribution canceled https://deborahjmiller.com/cts-500000-home-test-kits-not-delivered-overnight-thursdays-distribution-canceled/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 12:45:00 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/cts-500000-home-test-kits-not-delivered-overnight-thursdays-distribution-canceled/ With the uncertain delivery of the 500,000 Connecticut home test kits purchased from a California company, city officials sent messages overnight to notify residents that some distribution events Thursday would be canceled. Overnight, a message was sent to city officials saying, “No overnight test kit theft. No distribution on Thursday will be possible. More information […]]]>

With the uncertain delivery of the 500,000 Connecticut home test kits purchased from a California company, city officials sent messages overnight to notify residents that some distribution events Thursday would be canceled.

Overnight, a message was sent to city officials saying, “No overnight test kit theft. No distribution on Thursday will be possible. More information as received, ”according to the governor’s office.

The City of New London shared on Facebook: “The city just received a notification that the test kits will not be available for distribution on Thursday. As a result, the cast scheduled for Thursday has been canceled.


The town’s post included a screenshot of a post apparently from the Emergency Services and Public Protection Department that was similar to the one shared by the governor’s office.

In a similar post around midnight, Norfolk Emergency Management said: “At 11:40 pm tonight all municipalities in CT were notified of the failure to deliver the Covid test kits as promised. As such, our distribution event scheduled for Friday has been canceled. We will make another announcement when we have new information. “

Other cities have started canceling distribution events scheduled for Thursday, including Ansonia and Fairfield.

Governor Ned Lamont released a statement on Wednesday evening that testing had been delayed due to problems on the west coast.

“Due to shipping and warehouse delays out of the state of Connecticut’s control, our state’s planned shipment of COVID-19 home rapid tests is currently delayed from arriving in Connecticut,” Lamont said.

When Lamont announced that the state had purchased 1.5 million home test kits on Monday, the tests were not yet available. Since then, state officials have made efforts to get the first shipment to Connecticut, hoping to get them to cities for distribution this week, ahead of the New Years holiday.

On Wednesday evening, Paul Mounds, chief of staff at Lamont, said: “We have provided realistic information to the municipalities. We hope to be able to put them in place for tomorrow … It is imminent. It’s just a matter of things moving, that’s all.

And Mounds said the state trusts the provider of the tests.

“We have a legitimate vendor that we’ve worked with in the past, we know exactly where these tests are at right now,” Mounds said.

Previously, the governor’s office said it obtained 1.5 million test kits directly from the vendor for about $ 18.5 million in federal funds.

After Lamont released the statement, a spokesperson for the governor clarified that the state originally expected the shipment to arrive on Wednesday and there was always the possibility that it would be delivered later in the day. evening or at night.

Asked early Thursday about an updated schedule for delivery, Lamont spokesman Max Reiss said it was too early to tell, but the governor’s office had vowed to keep cities up to date on the latest information.

The state purchased 1.5 million kits – for a total of 3 million tests – directly from the manufacturer. The second phase of the state delivery will send 1 million kits to schools across the state starting next month.

The tests, performed by California-based iHealth Labs, were approved by the Food and Drug Administration under emergency use authorization.

The promise of home testing kits comes amid an overwhelming demand for testing after the Christmas holidays as highly transmissible variants, including omicron and delta scanning across Connecticut.

Connecticut reported its highest positivity rate on a single day of new COVID-19 testing on Wednesday when 17.78% returned positive. Cases and hospitalizations have seen some of the biggest day-long jumps during the pandemic.

Check back for updates.


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Douglas Wyatt publishes his first book Holy Cow: Life’s First Miracle Food | https://deborahjmiller.com/douglas-wyatt-publishes-his-first-book-holy-cow-lifes-first-miracle-food/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 18:20:00 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/douglas-wyatt-publishes-his-first-book-holy-cow-lifes-first-miracle-food/ SEDONA, Arizona., December 28, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Today, Douglas wyatt announces the publication of his first book, “Holy Cow: The Miracle of Life’s First Food”. The goal of Wyatt’s new book is to introduce bovine colostrum to wellness-conscious people who may experience leaky gut or face long-term immune issues. In the book, Wyatt […]]]>

SEDONA, Arizona., December 28, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Today, Douglas wyatt announces the publication of his first book, “Holy Cow: The Miracle of Life’s First Food”. The goal of Wyatt’s new book is to introduce bovine colostrum to wellness-conscious people who may experience leaky gut or face long-term immune issues.

In the book, Wyatt explores the historical use of colostrum and milk from ancient Egypt to the present day, and recounts his unlikely path to rediscovering bovine colostrum as he searches for answers for his ailing wife, Kay.

With an explosive crisis of chronic and autoimmune diseases in Western societies, Wyatt highlights the role of colostrum in stopping leaky gut, preventing the passage of toxins from the gut to the rest of the body, and reducing blood loss. Inappropriate inflammatory reactions over time, contribute to disease, debilitation, and premature death.

“Desperation is a great tool to lead to discovery,” said Douglas wyatt, research director of the Vibrant Life Initiative. “My love for Kay and the desire to help her heal inspired my tenacity in bringing bovine colostrum to more people. It is my lifelong dream to educate as many people as possible about the root causes of the disease. and the healing qualities of the first mammalian food source, colostrum. “

Bovine colostrum has established itself as an effective nutritional supplement with many applications, and Wyatt’s book offers sustainable health solutions.

Pocket editions of the retail novel for $ 19.95 and an e-book edition is available through Amazon Kindle for $ 6.95.

For more information visit: Holycowbook.org.

On Douglas wyatt

Douglas Alan Wyatt is part of United States’ pioneering authorities on the use of bovine colostrum for human and animal health, having been unofficially named “The Modern Father of Colostrum”. He is well known for his work supporting the use of bovine colostrum as a gastrointestinal and immune health supplement for the prevention and management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. He is also responsible for establishing the gold standard in the manufacture of colostrum supplements and credited with reintroducing bovine colostrum for human consumption. Dr. Wyatt believes that colostrum’s unique and potent healing bioactives hold incredible promise in turning the tide in the prevention and treatment of the growing global epidemic of chronic disease and may now have a role to play in emerging deadly pathogens. My. Wyatt is also a veteran, having served as a marine helicopter pilot during the Vietnam War.

Media contact

Caroline Baumgartner, Holy Cow Book, 1 2032193933, caroline@naturalbrandpartners.com

THE SOURCE Douglas wyatt


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Restaurant Review: ‘It’s been a year of highs – and highs’ | Food https://deborahjmiller.com/restaurant-review-its-been-a-year-of-highs-and-highs-food/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 21:58:00 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/restaurant-review-its-been-a-year-of-highs-and-highs-food/ IIt was the year we longed for the normality of a restaurant meal, whatever the abnormality of the experience for that to happen. It doesn’t matter that the waiters are hidden or that the tables are scattered around the room as if they are being prepared for an interrogation, or that there may be screens […]]]>

IIt was the year we longed for the normality of a restaurant meal, whatever the abnormality of the experience for that to happen. It doesn’t matter that the waiters are hidden or that the tables are scattered around the room as if they are being prepared for an interrogation, or that there may be screens between these tables. If the basics were there – a list of dishes you didn’t cook yourself, someone to look for them, a dish pass – many of us were there for that. Sometimes we felt like all of us, customers and employees, were working really hard to share this illusion of normalcy.

But 2021 was not normal. I started mine by painting my shelves for satisfying cookbooks to fill a restaurant column with when all restaurants were closed. I rediscovered the talent of great recipe authors and cooks such as Claudia Roden, Simon Hopkinson and the late Gary Rhodes. The latter finally taught me to swallow my shame and learn to make custard from scratch. Custard defeated; acquired life skills. Thanks, Gary. You may not be here anymore, but you have held my hand from beyond the grave.

“The dish I received the most correspondence on was a marvel of carbohydrates and dairy fat”: Wigmore Cheese Toast. Photograph: Sophia Evans / The Observer

When the time finally came, I took the opportunity to step out of my own kitchen like an A-level student galloping out of the exam room after the final exam. I recently made a list of the best dining experiences of the last year and the top three that came to my mind were all outside of London. I loved the butch and daring cuisine at Double Red Duke in Oxfordshire, with its devil kidneys in bright gravy and fatty scallops under drifts of garlic crumbs. The sunny early evening I spent in the Sonny stores in Bristol, sweeping the bulk of the salted anchovies on crusty bread and demolishing a plate of perfect meringues with white peaches, will stay with me for a very long time. And then there was Erst’s little menu in Manchester, which offered a lot more than it promised: bubbling, blistered flatbreads drenched in garlic butter; steak tartare in a garish tonnato sauce; a berry panna cotta that melted on the tongue.

In a time when polarized opinions have become a spectator sport, someone somewhere is now going to extrapolate from that that all restaurants in London are so awful. Obviously not. The dish I had the most correspondence on was the golden carbohydrate and dairy fat wonder of a Double XL and Triple Cheese Toastie served to me at Wigmore. People have shared photos of their own on social media, like tourists proving they too had visited Angkor Wat while on vacation. Only, it was an Angkor Wat made from roasted sourdough, Ogleshield, raclette and Montgomery cheddar. Elsewhere in the capital, I was delighted with the intense nerdiness of Humble Chicken where many specific parts of the bird were carefully grilled on sticks over hot coals. Oh, that line of pastors’ noses.

The dining room at Double Red Duke restaurant, Clanfield, Oxfordshire
Second portions: the Double Red Duke, in Oxfordshire. Photograph: Karen Robinson / The Observer

Honorable mentions must also go to the bravery of the Dirik brothers of Mangal 2 who broke with the traditions of the many Turkish grill houses around them in Dalston, to serve something a little more subtle and, in his curious way. , Scandinavian. And then there’s the extraordinary bespoke sushi experience Chris Restrepo told Kurisu Omakase, operating in his parents’ cafe in Brixton. I love dinner and a show so much.

But if you want some silliness in the restaurant business, if you want a business proposition that will make you roll your eyes so aggressively that your neighbors will be able to hear the ball rubbing against the socket, capital is always guaranteed to deliver. It says a lot about the truly horrible people you all are, that when I finally broke my self-imposed ban on negative reviews by dismembering the Polo Lounge pop-up on the roof of the Dorchester Hotel on Park Lane in London , it has become my most read review of the year online. They deserved it for scoring the standard bog wines by a factor of six or seven, and charging £ 38 for a McCarthy salad that looked like someone who tried to color code vegetables as part of a one-day intermediary management liaison.

A round white plate with stuffed kidneys
“Butch, gutsy cooking”: the kidneys to the devil at Double Red Duke. Photograph: Karen Robinson / The Observer

The second most read review online? It had to be my stupid stunt past Salt Bae’s Nusr-et Steakhouse in Knightsbridge, during which I turned down a super expensive gold leaf-wrapped steak in favor of a take-out from the wonderful Kebab Kid. I’ll admit I felt a bit of a fool sitting at a picnic table on the sidewalk outside, but not as much, dare I, as all those people who still go there for £ 1,000 of wrapped steaks. gold leaf, even though dear Salt Bae – that’s Mr Bae to you – left London weeks ago, probably sprinkling various seasonings on his private jet while howling with laughter.

Of course, as I wandered from table to table with my back to the arduous task of eating my tea, the life of the restaurants themselves were a little less dreamy. Many reopened after the lockdown only to find the staff they depended on were simply no longer there. Some had reassessed what they expected from life during the pandemic and concluded that a tough job in the hospitality industry was not this one. Others were EU citizens who had simply returned home.

First dining room
“Delivered much more than he promised”: Erst, Manchester. Photography: Shaw and Shaw

When I pointed out in a recent review that this forces restaurants to shorten their opening hours and blamed this squarely on Brexit, a number of people said that was a positive. This meant that people were no longer willing to work for what was too often the poor wages offered by hospitality. While I don’t think that negates the arguments against total Brexit bullshit, they are right.

Each week, the commentators of my online reviews compare the prices of British restaurants unfavorably to those in rural Thailand or the Ukraine, for example, without recognizing the differences between the economies. These comparisons are unnecessary. Running a UK restaurant is expensive and this past year has shown us just how fragile the industry’s business model can be. If we want to eat well and be served by well paid people, we will have to accept that it will continue to cost more. This does not mean that all the prices are good. Some restaurants take liberties. Good value is important. But the cost of restaurant meals is increasing. Don’t bother blaming me for that. It’s just a fact. And this will still be the case in 2022. See you next year.

Email Jay at jay.rayner@observer.co.uk or follow him on Twitter @ jayrayner1



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US to spend $ 25 million to distribute east coast fish to nutrition programs https://deborahjmiller.com/us-to-spend-25-million-to-distribute-east-coast-fish-to-nutrition-programs/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 17:29:10 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/us-to-spend-25-million-to-distribute-east-coast-fish-to-nutrition-programs/ The federal government will spend $ 25 million on East Coast fish to support nutrition assistance programs and help New England’s struggling commercial fishing industry. The US Department of Agriculture said on Wednesday it would proceed with the purchase of Atlantic groundfish. These are a group of species such as cod, haddock, and pollock that […]]]>

The federal government will spend $ 25 million on East Coast fish to support nutrition assistance programs and help New England’s struggling commercial fishing industry.

The US Department of Agriculture said on Wednesday it would proceed with the purchase of Atlantic groundfish. These are a group of species such as cod, haddock, and pollock that come to the docks in states like Massachusetts and Maine and are popular at seafood markets and restaurants.

The purchase came after members of the Massachusetts congressional delegation called on the USDA to purchase more seafood from the east coast through its food distribution programs for residents in need. The purchase will help fill pantries and boost an east coast seafood industry still grappling with the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, delegation members said.

USDA “continues to support the Atlantic seafood industry, as we have urged to do, after our contributions have been overlooked for too long in federal purchases,” Democrats said. Markey and Elizabeth Warren and Democratic Representatives William Keating and Seth Moulton in a statement.

The New England ground fishing industry is one of the oldest trading enterprises in the United States. The USDA buyout comes as the industry is reeling from a series of shocks that have threatened its viability.

American fishermen fished over 100 million pounds of cod per year in the 1980s. Catches were less than 2 million pounds in total last year. Fisheries managers attributed the decline to overfishing and environmental conditions.

Fishing industry managers have also recommended reducing cod catch limits which have already been reduced in recent years. The New England Fisheries Management Regulatory Board said this month it had called for a reduction in the commercial catch of Georges Bank cod from about 2.4 million pounds to about 540,000 pounds per next year. Georges Bank is a key fishing area off New England.

The poor condition of the cod stock resulted in “a sharp reduction from previous catch limits,” the council said in a statement.

The USDA did not respond to a request for comment on the purchase of groundfish.


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Donations to Food For The Hungry Total Over $ 250,000, Continuing to Grow | Life & Culture https://deborahjmiller.com/donations-to-food-for-the-hungry-total-over-250000-continuing-to-grow-life-culture/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 21:29:00 +0000 https://deborahjmiller.com/donations-to-food-for-the-hungry-total-over-250000-continuing-to-grow-life-culture/ MOUNT VERNON – The 40th anniversary of the Food For The Hungry campaign has brought together Knox County residents, businesses, schools and organizations to help fight food insecurity. These collective efforts resulted in donations totaling $ 257,538 and 26 trucks full of food and the total continues to grow. Community members came together again this […]]]>

MOUNT VERNON – The 40th anniversary of the Food For The Hungry campaign has brought together Knox County residents, businesses, schools and organizations to help fight food insecurity.

These collective efforts resulted in donations totaling $ 257,538 and 26 trucks full of food and the total continues to grow.

Community members came together again this year to support food aid projects and provide emergency services to clients through Interchurch Social Services, The Salvation Army and other organizations d County of Knox Food Aid.

On Friday, December 10, volunteers staffed 12 different collection points across the county to collect food and cash, while local media combined to produce an eight-hour live radio show and live broadcast. direct.

During the show, FFTH announced 19 grants totaling $ 38,000 to county projects involving food aid.

Grants of $ 2,000 went to:

Byron Saunders Foundation, Knox County Chapter

Pantry of the central Christian church

Community Hunger Awareness Mobile Pantry (CHOMP)

Pantry of the Church of the Alliance

First Congregational Church of Christ Hot Meal Program

Fredericktown United Methodist Church, Peace Meal Program

The Freedom Center, nutrition program in recovery

Knox County Quarry Center Pantry

Knox County Task Force for Seniors

Knox Learning Center, Hungry For Knowledge Project

Lifepoint Church, Backpacks of Hope

New Directions Project, Hunger Needs After Hours

North Bend Brethren Church

Saying a prayer Ministries / In Joy Food Pantry

Rising church pantry

The fathers table, the pantry and the hot meal

TouchPointe Resources on Marriage and Family

Here are some other exciting totals!

The Knox County Elementary School collection was housed by the Psi Iota Xi Sorority. The students collected $ 16,786.54 and 12,686 food items!

Centerburg 1,842 food items and $ 2,436.65

Danville 732 food products and $ 1,045.00

East Knox 1,384 food items and $ 1,358.00

Fredericktown 1,576 food items and $ 2,495.86

Columbia 979 food products and $ 1,060.00

Dan Emmett 1,045 food items and $ 241.00

Est 667 food items and $ 1,348.00

Pleasant Street 844 food items and $ 485.00

Mount Vernon Middle School 760 food items and $ 1,731.00

St. Vincent de Paul 425 food items and $ 532.00

Twin Oak 1,021 food items and $ 1,571.00

Wiggin Street 1,051 food items and $ 2,075.00

The Learning Center 361 food products and $ 186.00

The Knox County High School Collection was a huge success. Local high schools raised a total of $ 11,382.53 and 7,841 food items! That is 6.28 trucks!

Volunteer Shawn Dugan was our high school collection and competition coordinator.

Centerburg High School: 213 food items and $ 105.00

Danville high school: 201 food items and $ 152.25

East Knox High School – 1 food truck

Fredericktown High School: $ 1,464.07

The Knox County Career Center: $ 8,119.21 and 6,951 food items (5.57 food trucks)

1. Lab with the most articles overall — Auto Tech Lab

2. Laboratory that provided the most food products (no cash) – Landscape design and management laboratory

3. Winner of Penny Battle — Landscape Design and Management Laboratory

Mount Vernon High School: 476 food items and $ 1,542.00

The best competition collecting schools in Central Knox County and Greater Knox County are recognized and awarded with multi-year traveling plaques to recognize their accomplishments and contribution to the FFTH.

The 2021 Central Knox County Award goes to the Knox County Career Center.

The 2021 Grand Knox County Prize goes to Fredericktown.

New this year to celebrate FFTH’s 40th anniversary, a very special category has been created for the next most collector high school after the two winning schools: All-Knox Runner-up Category – Mount Vernon High School

The Kenyon Snowflake Gala continues to be a significant contributor to FFTH. In another year with multiple challenges, the gala fundraiser totaled $ 80,860! Kenyon presented this year’s William A. Stroud Jr. Award for Community Service to the people of Knox County.

Mount Vernon Nazarene University presented the Stephen W. Zelkowitz Memorial Award to Kathy Brechler of Kenyon College. Kathy was honored for her many years of service helping coordinate the Kenyon Snowflake Gala and other collections in Kenyon. We honor his incredible commitment and passion for the annual FFTH Drive.

Fredericktown Christmas Walk – $ 9,356.87

Mount Vernon Dental & SuperQ 93.7 WQIO – $ 4,668.00 and a quarter food truck

Knox Community Hospital $ 9,900.00 and ¾ food truck

Knox County Service Club Competition – $ 3,515.00

Mount Vernon Nazarene University Faith Works Program – $ 2,306.09

Turkey Trot $ 1,034 and 264 food items

Battle of the Cafes: $ 1,881.59 and 31 food items

Folkfest (Foodstock) – $ 1,050.00 and 115 food items

Fire and Ice – $ 1,270.00 and 205 food items

Centerburg Wreath Auction: $ 90.00.

The Knox County Career Center Online Silent Auction – $ 3,542.00.

One event continues through December 30, with the Festival of Trees at the Floral Valley Community Center in Apple Valley, continuing through December 30.

Red Rover Marathon – 70 food items and $ 130.00

Interchurch Branch – 27 food items and $ 784.29

Hometown Market: 87 Food Items and $ 251.00 Total:

Interchurch Branch – 26 food items and $ 497.00

Hometown Market – 23 food items and $ 74.00

BellStores – 29 food items and $ 146.00

The village market – 0.6 food truck (just over half a truck) and $ 4,618.00

Aldi – .4 food truck (just under half a truck) and $ 99.00

Kroger – .75 food truck (2/3 truck) and $ 420.00

Lanning’s Foods – 0.35 truckload of food (just over ¼ truck) and $ 438.00

Baker’s IGA – 0.6 load of food (just over half a truck)

Lowes – .25 food truck (1/4 truck) and $ 1,153.00

Wal-Mart Supercenter – 0.75 load of food (2/3 truck) and $ 1,790.00

The Knox Memorial – Lots of Food and $ 8,014.00

Thank you for doing your part to fight hunger in our community! You can stay up to date on photos, radio interviews, videos and more at foodforthehungrycares.org. The video archive of Saturday’s show is also available on MVNU.tv in the on-demand tab and will be available for a full year.

Food For The Hungry, celebrating 40 years of working together to take care of our neighbors.

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